Spillikins №61. Systemic crisis in Nokia or on the edge of the abyss

A lot of news from Nokia, however, it was prompted by the quick announcement of the company's flagship for the second half of 2010, the introduction of Symbian^3 and the opportunity to get acquainted with both on real devices. Disappointment is the weakest description of what I had to face. At the moment, I have not yet decided whether to arrange a preliminary acquaintance with a scattering of new products from Nokia before the official announcement or not. I'll decide in a week, so if photos of N, C, E-series from Nokia with the logo of our resource suddenly crawl around the net, know that I've decided. But let's talk about the disappointment that overtook me this week.

Table:

OVI Store - concept failed, concept changed

A year ago in Barcelona, ​​Nokia launched its own app store with great fanfare. Even before the announcement, I pointed out that the store has certain flaws, it became obvious to everyone in the first months of commercial operation. And the company decided to carry out a soft restart of the OVI Store, which was scheduled for April 2010, a couple of lines about this in the December Spillikins #46. What can be noted, the restart took place, but it did not bring miracles.

Obvious little things have been updated, for example, a rating system has been established, consisting not of 3, but of five stars. Allowed to vote and write comments only to users who have downloaded or bought the application. The desktop version has the ability to select your phone from the list, there is no need to log in with your account. They said that they improved the presentation of programs and their search.

Let's step aside for a moment and talk about how Nokia create an S60 or Symbian^3 representation. I don't want to talk about high matters, spaceships, or anything that is beyond the knowledge of the average student. In my opinion, it's time to remember the simplicity of the menu, consistency and unity. For several years, at every meeting with Nokia managers, from ordinary people involved in specific products to top managers responsible for the development of the company, I have said, and written, more than once that the menu in two Nokia phones on the S60 will never does not look like it. The section with office applications can be searched in various places, and for me it turns into flour. Every time you play a guessing game, but where did they put the label on the application this time. Of course, you can spend half an hour on each device and customize everything for yourself. But, excuse me, what prevents the manufacturer from creating a single menu for all S60-based phones, as was done for the S40/S30 platform and as all manufacturers in the world do. I'll explain and clarify.I'm not saying that such and such a menu item, for example, a calculator, must be present in the Office section. Oh no. I'm talking about the fact that if it was placed in the Office, then it should be in this section in all phones. Is it logical? In my opinion, this is the only way to create the continuity of generations, only this way a person who has bought a new device is able to start using it practically with his eyes closed. Why Nokia forgot about it remains a mystery to me. For now, you have to spend time and effort searching for standard applications in different folders.

Do you want more examples of the lack of logic and the inability to organize work inside Nokia? After all, such "little things" are a chronic problem of the company, when one department cannot agree with another what to do and, most importantly, how. Meetings of the working groups go one after another, but apart from the loss of time they do not bring anything. The issue of menu organization is not difficult to implement ideologically, and the people at Nokia themselves understand this. This is the problem of how people within the company agree.

Let's move on with examples. Especially in order to write about the OVI Store update, I decided to get the retired Nokia X6 and update the software on it. For those who are not familiar with the S60, I note that there is a “Software Update” item in the menu, from which, with one touch, the device starts checking for updates and immediately installs them. Conveniently? Yes, definitely. Does it work? Partially. Nokia does not follow uniformity, so one program may be added to this item, and another may be missing. This happened with the OVI Store, the program was not included in the general update, but when the store was launched, a proposal appeared to install a new version. As they say, the company needs to decide whether it wants to install programs and updates from a separate application or each application will update itself. Both approaches have the right to life, but so far there is only confusion and nothing else.

The described problems have absolutely nothing to do with technology, it is a matter of organizing the process. And here Nokia is clearly losing to other players. However, this is also expressed in the way the company spends money lately. Merciless marketing from Nokia burns the company's money only for the sake of reporting, since there is simply no other sense in their activity. For example, knowing that the Russian OVI Store is not very relevant, does not sell anything really, the company launched a massive advertising campaign in December. Someone talks about millions, but I think that the amounts are more modest, but significant. And what was the use of this advertising campaign?

During the week, we managed to get hold of the OVI Store download/sales statistics in different countries and regions of the world. Considering that the company does not officially provide statistics, but only talks about the number of downloads and reports on success, I will not post this confidential document. But I will talk about the tricks that are used to polish reality and show the success of the OVI Store, which are extremely doubtful.

So, on March 23, Nokia's official blog reported that Shazam, the music detection app, had been downloaded over a million times from the OVI Store. And what an achievement, since the application was loaded from 178 countries and so on. You can read the English text here.

Sorry, I didn't download this app from the OVI Store, I had it in a software update for the S60, as did tens of thousands of other people. Let's still decide whether adding a trial version of software in the "Software Update" is analogous to downloading from the OVI Store, where else you need to go, or is it something else. In my opinion, downloading from the OVI Store is treated unambiguously. This is when I go to the OVI Store and consciously download something from there. Not when a company lists an app and I download it hoping to see the full version of the software. By the way, on X6 I downloaded this application through an update about 6 times, from the first time it could not install itself correctly. I am sure that all 6 times were counted and scrupulously attributed to the "success" of the OVI Store.

Okay, this grumbling of mine is unconvincing and doesn't prove anything. Let's have a competition. The initial conditions of the competition will be very simple. A brand new application store, accessed from a huge number of Nokia phones, an army of users of these phones. A huge advertising campaign, which in theory was supposed to tell that there is an OVI Store and something can be done with it.

On the other hand, there are 30 Nokia branded stores in Moscow, where you can buy programs and install them right there from the SoftKey catalog. The programs are not unique, they are also present in the OVI Store, the choice of programs is less, which is understandable.

Do you know who won this competition? On the question, it is already clear that OVI Store lost with a devastating score. All marketing communications from Nokia are water poured into the sand in the desert. Efficiency is zero or even below zero. The problem of marketing in this aspect is simple: people do not work for the effectiveness of communications, campaigns, but simply for reporting. We did an OVI Store campaign, it went great, millions of people know about our store, millions of people have seen it. Hooray. And we are not responsible for sales, so let the manager responsible for the OVI Store have this headache, this is his area of ​​​​responsibility. This is how the company lives, resting on its laurels, when efficiency is not at the forefront, and marketing is engaged in drawing beautiful numbers. The situation is very similar to that at Sony Ericsson a couple of years ago, where everything started with similar bells. It is clear that companies are different in size, but still these are disturbing symptoms of a systemic crisis.

Let's go back to the updated OVI Store, where the developers have left a lot of work for themselves for the next year, so as not to sit idle, so to speak. The first trouble comes from the desire to saturate the store with applications and comments, to show activity, which in fact is not in such a volume. The calculation is correct, but the implementation causes a smirk. The Russian OVI Store has programs from Russian companies with English descriptions. Wow. Where, why, why? The explanation is simple - they do not count on the Russian market and, perhaps, they are right about something. But that doesn't excuse Nokia, which omits such descriptions. This will obviously be fixed, long and hard, spending hundreds of man-hours.

Another funny detail that goes beyond good and evil is the lack of comment moderation. In order not to embarrass someone, I removed the brightest statements, but the remaining screenshots are indicative. But that's not all with the comment system. For some reason, it shows comments in all languages ​​for each program. This was done to create a feeling of extras, look how many people are discussing the program. But the quality of this discussion leaves much to be desired. For example, I went to read about Skype, my first comment in Arabic popped up. There are plenty of those below as well. If at least I read English at the very least, then I don’t read Arabic. I would like to learn, but obviously not to read the comments in the OVI Store.

Let's go further: the comments will now indicate from which phone the person wrote it and, accordingly, on which device he uses the program. For example, Eldar Murtazin wrote a comment about Twitter with the Nokia X6. Attention, question.Why this feature if the store automatically shows only programs that are compatible with your phone? This will create the very confusion when a person, having looked at the comments from the top ten and not finding his phone, begins to doubt whether this program suits him. Does he need her. Why raise such doubts? Just for the sake of such a "cool" feature or a subsequent fix? This is another sign of a systemic crisis - at first, the company does something, and then they begin to think about why they did it and how right it was. It's a pity, but this results in a number of problems, which then affect the perception of the brand.

Do I believe in a bright future for the OVI Store? Not yet. And the reason is simple. I forced myself to study the contents of the store several times in order to download and buy programs for the same Nokia X6. In addition to Gravity did not buy anything. It just doesn't come across anything interesting. For comparison, I picked up my Apple iPod Touch, for which I didn’t buy a lot of applications, I do it sporadically and under the influence of an impulse (I heard about the program, read it, saw it from someone, and so on). Guess how many apps I have purchased? About two dozen and about a dozen free ones or those that you could try like that. I was not too lazy and looked at the account statement to find out how much money I spent on these pleasures. Almost $42 a year.

This is probably why we will continue to be fed data on "record" downloads, the success of individual programs, because for the OVI Store there is no such simple thing as the average check per active customer. More precisely, it is, but the numbers are so scanty that they cause a smile. Personally, I'm willing to give the OVI Store time to make the store better and have more software. How many companies will it take? A year, two, three? I am ready to wait and spend my money in other places, since Nokia apparently does not need this money.

Symbian^3 or don't expect miracles

I often feel like I'm a kid in a candy store when I'm introduced to new devices. Here it is, a new toy, it contains so much pleasure from discovering the unknown. You take a candy in a beautiful package, put it in your mouth ... and instead of a candy - a dusty nasty plastic dummy, which can break your teeth. Can you imagine the feeling? These are the feelings I had from actually getting to know Symbian^3 on several yet unannounced models, which are already quite ready for launch and announcement.

When I was writing a review of the Nokia N97, many of the device's problems were attributed by the company to a prototype, then to an early model, then to something else, I don't even remember. The fact remains that the company has never had such a problematic model with such a price. This is a disaster that even top managers of the company recognize (I wrote about this in Spillikins #56).

Users even began to shoot their videos, in which they scoff at the Nokia N97 advertisement and show its inconsistency with reality. The video turned out to be revealing.

I already wrote about the Symbian^3 interface in some detail, also in Spillikins.

Drum roll. The collision with reality turned out to be excessive for my organism, which had not grown stronger after the winter. This, this is what they call a modern interface and success is predicted, this one? I specially shared oohs about the appearance of the device (we are talking about Vaska, who looks very nice to me) with opinions about the internal stuffing. Because they are two different sides of the same issue. Vaska is the only one, but Symbian^3 is for everyone. So, those who saw the device codenamed "Vaska" (it was also in spy photos in previous Spillikins) noted that it was pleasant, attractive. It depends on the color scheme, but here the designers did their best, the model turned out to be good in appearance. I repeat that if I decide, then in the week I will post a first look at it and a couple of other models.

Now let's move on to the stuffing, that is, the interface, the menu. And then people immediately realize that they have a regular Nokia touchscreen. The comments were different, but in the end they kept asking: “I don’t see what was changed in the interface here.” And I started showing desktops, widgets, one-touch. They looked at me like I was crazy and asked again: “Is this an achievement for Nokia? Make multiple desktops and click in one click? You know, I really don't know what to say to that. I don't know at all. Such an update does not pull on a new version of the OS. It doesn’t pull at all, of course, if you are not a turtle that crawls slowly in the very desert where marketing digs in budgets.

And here you can scold me that at first I myself advocated continuity, but here I advocate some changes, innovations. But, excuse me, there is a classic that is pleasant and good. There are innovations that are needed. The touch S60 is neither classic nor innovative. But only stupefying work on mistakes, the end and edge of which is not visible.

The most ungrateful thing is to evaluate the performance of the OS according to the prototype. But given that there are general trends that have persisted for years in commercial products, when you see them in Symbian^3, you suspect that they will remain in commercial products as well. So, with the active use of the prototype, the desktop crashes, exactly the same story on other touch devices from Nokia. Approximately once every few hours the device “freezes”, this is due to some kind of background activity of the system, I could not find out who was to blame for this. The device is not very fast compared to Android or Bada phones, this is the previous generation. Achievement for Nokia, but within the market average performance. Well, you understood yourself. A beautiful wrapper, and inside - the same dummy. And it's embarrassing as hell. It's time to wake up Nokia, otherwise the place on the podium will have to give way. Competitors are advancing, and very aggressively.

A few words from me or don't blame the mirror

Recently, Nokia has something to criticize for in Spillikins, and in other materials this topic is also touched upon. Often, our readers write letters to me that seem to be written according to the template: “You are right, Nokia is having a bad time. Blah blah blah. I see it too. Blah blah blah. But I think that you can’t write about the company like that, because you are killing their sales, which you have no right to do.”

The meaning of the letters boils down to one thing: the company has problems, and it is necessary to diligently keep silent about them. The maximum is to inform the employees of the company. So, those who have been reading me for many years know that I always inform companies about problems with products, services and other things privately. If such information appears on the pages of the site, on my blog, then this scheme is no longer valid, and the company begins to rush at full speed into the abyss. Of course, this is my assessment of the company's actions. And much smarter people who know perfectly well how and what they do can work in it. Maybe. But the task of the mirror is to reflect the surrounding world, as well as my task is to show what is happening. As soon as Nokia creates a service, a product, a phone that will change our ideas or simply be good, I will write about it, as I always did. But I don’t know how to write that a bad service or product is good, and it’s too late for me to relearn. Nokia marketing employs wonderful people who can agree that one or another journalist will write well about their product. This is their right. As well as my right to show the real state of affairs.Which, however, is fully measured in the same Softkey sales in Nokia stores and sales of the entire OVI Store in Russia. Two big differences - to be or to seem. My desire is for Nokia to be a strong player, not appear to be. Otherwise, the market will be boring without strong competition. The apocalypse will not come, since Nokia has a huge margin of safety. But the company squanders this stock today with extraordinary generosity, which looks like waste. If the situation does not change, then within a few years the problems will become visible, and they will be talked about on every corner. Is it worth bringing the company to this? The question is rhetorical, since Nokia has already lost the 2010 season. There is time to prepare for the next season.

Spillikins №61. Systemic crisis in Nokia or on the edge of the abyss

A lot of news from Nokia, however, it was prompted by the quick announcement of the company's flagship for the second half of 2010, the introduction of Symbian^3 and the opportunity to get acquainted with both on real devices. Disappointment is the weakest description of what I had to face. At the moment, I have not yet decided whether to arrange a preliminary acquaintance with a scattering of new products from Nokia before the official announcement or not. I'll decide in a week, so if photos of N, C, E-series from Nokia with the logo of our resource suddenly crawl around the net, know that I've decided. But let's talk about the disappointment that overtook me this week.

Table:

OVI Store - concept failed, concept changed

A year ago in Barcelona, ​​Nokia launched its own app store with great fanfare. Even before the announcement, I pointed out that the store has certain flaws, it became obvious to everyone in the first months of commercial operation. And the company decided to carry out a soft restart of the OVI Store, which was scheduled for April 2010, a couple of lines about this in the December Spillikins #46. What can be noted, the restart took place, but it did not bring miracles.

Obvious little things have been updated, for example, a rating system has been established, consisting not of 3, but of five stars. Allowed to vote and write comments only to users who have downloaded or bought the application. The desktop version has the ability to select your phone from the list, there is no need to log in with your account. They said that they improved the presentation of programs and their search.

Let's step aside for a moment and talk about how Nokia create an S60 or Symbian^3 representation. I don't want to talk about high matters, spaceships, or anything that is beyond the knowledge of the average student. In my opinion, it's time to remember the simplicity of the menu, consistency and unity. For several years, at every meeting with Nokia managers, from ordinary people involved in specific products to top managers responsible for the development of the company, I have said, and written, more than once that the menu in two Nokia phones on the S60 will never does not look like it. The section with office applications can be searched in various places, and for me it turns into flour. Every time you play a guessing game, but where did they put the label on the application this time. Of course, you can spend half an hour on each device and customize everything for yourself. But, excuse me, what prevents the manufacturer from creating a single menu for all S60-based phones, as was done for the S40/S30 platform and as all manufacturers in the world do. I'll explain and clarify.I'm not saying that such and such a menu item, for example, a calculator, must be present in the Office section. Oh no. I'm talking about the fact that if it was placed in the Office, then it should be in this section in all phones. Is it logical? In my opinion, this is the only way to create the continuity of generations, only this way a person who has bought a new device is able to start using it practically with his eyes closed. Why Nokia forgot about it remains a mystery to me. For now, you have to spend time and effort searching for standard applications in different folders.

Do you want more examples of the lack of logic and the inability to organize work inside Nokia? After all, such "little things" are a chronic problem of the company, when one department cannot agree with another what to do and, most importantly, how. Meetings of the working groups go one after another, but apart from the loss of time they do not bring anything. The issue of menu organization is not difficult to implement ideologically, and the people at Nokia themselves understand this. This is the problem of how people within the company agree.

Let's move on to the examples. Especially in order to write about the OVI Store update, I decided to get the retired Nokia X6 and update the software on it. For those who are not familiar with the S60, I note that there is a “Software Update” item in the menu, from which, with one touch, the device starts checking for updates and immediately installs them. Conveniently? Yes, definitely. Does it work? Partially. Nokia does not follow uniformity, so one program may be added to this item, and another may be missing. This happened with the OVI Store, the program was not included in the general update, but when the store was launched, a proposal appeared to install a new version. As they say, the company needs to decide whether it wants to install programs and updates from a separate application or each application will update itself. Both approaches have the right to life, but so far there is only confusion and nothing else.

The described problems have absolutely nothing to do with technology, it is a matter of organizing the process. And here Nokia is clearly losing to other players. However, this is also expressed in the way the company spends money lately. Merciless marketing from Nokia burns the company's money only for the sake of reporting, since there is simply no other sense in their activity. For example, knowing that the Russian OVI Store is not very relevant, does not sell anything really, the company launched a massive advertising campaign in December. Someone talks about millions, but I think that the amounts are more modest, but significant. And what was the use of this advertising campaign?

During the week, we managed to get hold of the OVI Store download/sales statistics in different countries and regions of the world. Considering that the company does not officially provide statistics, but only talks about the number of downloads and reports on success, I will not post this confidential document. But I will talk about the tricks that are used to polish reality and show the success of the OVI Store, which are extremely doubtful.

So, on March 23, Nokia's official blog reported that Shazam, the music detection app, had been downloaded over a million times from the OVI Store. And what an achievement, since the application was loaded from 178 countries and so on. You can read the English text here.

Sorry, I didn't download this app from the OVI Store, I had it in a software update for the S60, as did tens of thousands of other people. Let's still decide whether adding a trial version of software in the "Software Update" is analogous to downloading from the OVI Store, where else you need to go, or is it something else. In my opinion, downloading from the OVI Store is treated unambiguously. This is when I go to the OVI Store and consciously download something from there. Not when a company lists an app and I download it hoping to see the full version of the software. By the way, on X6 I downloaded this application through an update about 6 times, from the first time it could not install itself correctly. I am sure that all 6 times were counted and scrupulously attributed to the "success" of the OVI Store.

Okay, this grumbling of mine is unconvincing and doesn't prove anything. Let's have a competition. The initial conditions of the competition will be very simple. A brand new application store, accessed from a huge number of Nokia phones, an army of users of these phones. A huge advertising campaign, which in theory was supposed to tell that there is an OVI Store and something can be done with it.

On the other hand, there are 30 Nokia branded stores in Moscow, where you can buy programs and install them right there from the SoftKey catalog. The programs are not unique, they are also present in the OVI Store, the choice of programs is less, which is understandable.

Do you know who won this competition? On the question, it is already clear that OVI Store lost with a devastating score. All marketing communications from Nokia are water poured into the sand in the desert. Efficiency is zero or even below zero. The problem of marketing in this aspect is simple: people do not work for the effectiveness of communications, campaigns, but simply for reporting. We did an OVI Store campaign, it went great, millions of people know about our store, millions of people have seen it. Hooray. And we are not responsible for sales, so let the manager responsible for the OVI Store have this headache, this is his area of ​​​​responsibility. This is how the company lives, resting on its laurels, when efficiency is not at the forefront, and marketing is engaged in drawing beautiful numbers. The situation is very similar to that at Sony Ericsson a couple of years ago, where everything started with similar bells. It is clear that companies are different in size, but still these are disturbing symptoms of a systemic crisis.

Let's go back to the updated OVI Store, where the developers have left a lot of work for themselves for the next year, so as not to sit idle, so to speak. The first trouble comes from the desire to saturate the store with applications and comments, to show activity, which in fact is not in such a volume. The calculation is correct, but the implementation causes a smirk. The Russian OVI Store has programs from Russian companies with English descriptions. Wow. Where, why, why? The explanation is simple - they do not count on the Russian market and, perhaps, they are right about something. But that doesn't excuse Nokia, which omits such descriptions. This will obviously be fixed, long and hard, spending hundreds of man-hours.

Another funny detail that goes beyond good and evil is the lack of comment moderation. In order not to embarrass someone, I removed the brightest statements, but the remaining screenshots are indicative. But that's not all with the comment system. For some reason, it shows comments in all languages ​​for each program. This was done to create a feeling of extras, look how many people are discussing the program. But the quality of this discussion leaves much to be desired. For example, I went to read about Skype, my first comment in Arabic popped up. There are plenty of those below as well. If at least I read English at the very least, then I don’t read Arabic. I would like to learn, but obviously not to read the comments in the OVI Store.

Let's go further: the comments will now indicate from which phone the person wrote it and, accordingly, on which device he uses the program. For example, Eldar Murtazin wrote a comment about Twitter with the Nokia X6. Attention, question.Why this feature if the store automatically shows only programs that are compatible with your phone? This will create the very confusion when a person, having looked at the comments from the top ten and not finding his phone, begins to doubt whether this program suits him. Does he need her. Why raise such doubts? Just for the sake of such a "cool" feature or a subsequent fix? This is another sign of a systemic crisis - at first, the company does something, and then they begin to think about why they did it and how right it was. It's a pity, but this results in a number of problems, which then affect the perception of the brand.

Symbian^3 or don't expect miracles

I often feel like I'm a kid in a candy store when I'm introduced to new devices. Here it is, a new toy, it contains so much pleasure from discovering the unknown. You take a candy in a beautiful package, put it in your mouth ... and instead of a candy - a dusty nasty plastic dummy, which can break your teeth. Can you imagine the feeling? These are the feelings I had from actually getting to know Symbian^3 on several yet unannounced models, which are already quite ready for launch and announcement.

When I was writing a review of the Nokia N97, many of the device's problems were attributed by the company to a prototype, then to an early model, then to something else, I don't even remember. The fact remains: the company has never had such a problematic model with such a price. This is a disaster that even top managers of the company recognize (I wrote about this in Spillikins #56).

Users even began to shoot their videos, in which they scoff at the Nokia N97 advertisement and show its inconsistency with reality. The video turned out to be revealing.

I already wrote about the Symbian^3 interface in some detail, also in Spillikins.

Drum roll. The collision with reality turned out to be excessive for my organism, which had not grown stronger after the winter. This, this is what they call a modern interface and success is predicted, this one? I specially shared oohs about the appearance of the device (we are talking about Vaska, who looks very nice to me) with opinions about the internal stuffing. Because they are two different sides of the same issue. Vaska is the only one, but Symbian^3 is for everyone. So, those who saw the device codenamed "Vaska" (it was also in spy photos in previous Spillikins) noted that it was pleasant, attractive. It depends on the color scheme, but here the designers did their best, the model turned out to be good in appearance. I repeat that if I decide, then in the week I will post a first look at it and a couple of other models.

Now let's move on to the stuffing, that is, the interface, the menu. And then people immediately realize that they have a regular Nokia touchscreen. The comments were different, but in the end they kept asking: “I don’t see what was changed in the interface here.” And I started showing desktops, widgets, one-touch. They looked at me like I was crazy and asked again: “Is this an achievement for Nokia? Make multiple desktops and click in one click? You know, I really don't know what to say to that. I don't know at all. Such an update does not pull on a new version of the OS. It doesn’t pull at all, of course, if you are not a turtle that crawls slowly in the very desert where marketing digs in budgets.

And here you can scold me that at first I myself advocated continuity, but here I advocate some changes, innovations. But, excuse me, there is a classic that is pleasant and good. There are innovations that are needed. The touch S60 is neither classic nor innovative. But only stupefying work on mistakes, the end and edge of which is not visible.

The most ungrateful thing is to evaluate the performance of the OS according to the prototype. But given that there are general trends that have persisted for years in commercial products, when you see them in Symbian^3, you suspect that they will remain in commercial products as well. So, with the active use of the prototype, the desktop crashes, exactly the same story on other touch devices from Nokia. Approximately once every few hours the device “freezes”, this is due to some kind of background activity of the system, I could not find out who was to blame for this. The device is not very fast compared to Android or Bada phones, this is the previous generation. Achievement for Nokia, but within the market average performance. Well, you understood yourself. A beautiful wrapper, and inside - the same dummy. And it's embarrassing as hell. It's time to wake up Nokia, otherwise the place on the podium will have to give way. Competitors are advancing, and very aggressively.

A few words from me or don't blame the mirror

Recently, Nokia has something to criticize for in Spillikins, and in other materials this topic is also touched upon. Often, our readers write letters to me that seem to be written according to the template: “You are right, Nokia is having a bad time. Blah blah blah. I see it too. Blah blah blah. But I think that you can’t write about the company like that, because you are killing their sales, which you have no right to do.”

The meaning of the letters boils down to one thing: the company has problems, and it is necessary to diligently keep silent about them. The maximum is to inform the employees of the company. So, those who have been reading me for many years know that I always inform companies about problems with products, services and other things privately. If such information appears on the pages of the site, on my blog, then this scheme is no longer valid, and the company begins to rush at full speed into the abyss. Of course, this is my assessment of the company's actions. And much smarter people who know perfectly well how and what they do can work in it. Maybe. But the task of the mirror is to reflect the surrounding world, as well as my task is to show what is happening. As soon as Nokia creates a service, a product, a phone that will change our ideas or simply be good, I will write about it, as I always did. But I don’t know how to write that a bad service or product is good, and it’s too late for me to relearn. Nokia marketing employs wonderful people who can agree that this or that journalist will write well about their product. This is their right. As well as my right to show the real state of affairs.Which, however, is fully measured in the same Softkey sales in Nokia stores and sales of the entire OVI Store in Russia. Two big differences - to be or to seem. My desire is for Nokia to be a strong player, not appear to be. Otherwise, the market will be boring without strong competition. The apocalypse will not come, since Nokia has a huge margin of safety. But the company squanders this stock today with extraordinary generosity, which looks like waste. If the situation does not change, then within a few years the problems will become visible, and they will be talked about on every corner. Is it worth bringing the company to this? The question is rhetorical, since Nokia has already lost the 2010 season. There is time to prepare for the next season.

Spillikins №61. Systemic crisis at Nokia or on the edge of the abyss

A lot of news from Nokia, however, it was prompted by the quick announcement of the company's flagship for the second half of 2010, the introduction of Symbian^3 and the opportunity to get acquainted with both on real devices. Disappointment is the weakest description of what I had to face. At the moment, I have not decided yet whether to arrange a preliminary acquaintance with a scattering of new products from Nokia before the official announcement or not. I'll decide in a week, so if photos of N, C, E-series from Nokia with the logo of our resource suddenly crawl around the net, know that I've decided. But let's talk about the disappointment that overtook me this week.

Table:

OVI Store - concept failed, concept changed

A year ago in Barcelona, ​​Nokia launched its own app store with great fanfare. Even before the announcement, I pointed out that the store has certain flaws, it became obvious to everyone in the first months of commercial operation. And the company decided to carry out a soft restart of the OVI Store, which was scheduled for April 2010, a couple of lines about this in the December Spillikins #46. What can be noted, the restart took place, but it did not bring miracles.

Obvious little things have been updated, for example, a rating system has been established, consisting not of 3, but of five stars. Allowed to vote and write comments only to users who have downloaded or bought the application. The desktop version has the ability to select your phone from the list, there is no need to log in with your account. They said that they improved the presentation of programs and their search.

Let's step aside for a moment and talk about how Nokia create an S60 or Symbian^3 representation. I don't want to talk about high matters, spaceships, or anything that is beyond the knowledge of the average student. In my opinion, it's time to remember the simplicity of the menu, consistency and unity. For several years, at every meeting with Nokia managers, from ordinary people involved in specific products to top managers responsible for the development of the company, I have said, and written, more than once that the menu in two Nokia phones on the S60 will never does not look like it. The section with office applications can be searched in various places, and for me it turns into flour. Every time you play a guessing game, but where did they put the label on the application this time. Of course, you can spend half an hour on each device and customize everything for yourself. But, excuse me, what prevents the manufacturer from creating a single menu for all S60-based phones, as was done for the S40/S30 platform and as all manufacturers in the world do. I'll explain and clarify.I'm not saying that such and such a menu item, for example, a calculator, must be present in the Office section. Oh no. I'm talking about the fact that if it was placed in the Office, then it should be in this section in all phones. Is it logical? In my opinion, this is the only way to create the continuity of generations, only this way a person who has bought a new device is able to start using it practically with his eyes closed. Why Nokia forgot about it remains a mystery to me. For now, you have to spend time and effort searching for standard applications in different folders.

Do you want more examples of the lack of logic and the inability to organize work inside Nokia? After all, such "little things" are a chronic problem of the company, when one department cannot agree with another what to do and, most importantly, how. Meetings of the working groups go one after another, but apart from the loss of time they do not bring anything. The issue of menu organization is not difficult to implement ideologically, and the people at Nokia themselves understand this. This is the problem of how people within the company agree.

Let's move on to the examples. Especially in order to write about the OVI Store update, I decided to get the retired Nokia X6 and update the software on it. For those who are not familiar with the S60, I note that there is a “Software Update” item in the menu, from which, with one touch, the device starts checking for updates and immediately installs them. Conveniently? Yes, definitely. Does it work? Partially. Nokia does not follow uniformity, so one program may be added to this item, and another may be missing. This happened with the OVI Store, the program was not included in the general update, but when the store was launched, a proposal appeared to install a new version. As they say, the company needs to decide whether it wants to install programs and updates from a separate application or each application will update itself. Both approaches have the right to life, but so far there is only confusion and nothing else.

The described problems have absolutely nothing to do with technology, it is a matter of organizing the process. And here Nokia is clearly losing to other players. However, this is also expressed in the way the company spends money lately. Merciless marketing from Nokia burns the company's money only for the sake of reporting, since there is simply no other sense in their activity. For example, knowing that the Russian OVI Store is not very relevant, does not sell anything really, the company launched a massive advertising campaign in December. Someone talks about millions, but I think that the amounts are more modest, but significant. And what was the use of this advertising campaign?

During the week, we managed to get hold of the OVI Store download/sales statistics in different countries and regions of the world. Considering that the company does not officially provide statistics, but only talks about the number of downloads and reports on success, I will not post this confidential document. But I will talk about the tricks that are used to polish reality and show the success of the OVI Store, which are extremely doubtful.

So, on March 23, Nokia's official blog reported that Shazam, the music detection app, had been downloaded over a million times from the OVI Store. And what an achievement, since the application was loaded from 178 countries and so on. You can read the English text here.

Sorry, I didn't download this app from the OVI Store, I had it in a software update for the S60, as did tens of thousands of other people. Let's still decide whether adding a trial version of software in the "Software Update" is analogous to downloading from the OVI Store, where else you need to go, or is it something else. In my opinion, downloading from the OVI Store is treated unambiguously. This is when I go to the OVI Store and consciously download something from there. Not when a company lists an app and I download it hoping to see the full version of the software. By the way, on X6 I downloaded this application through an update about 6 times, from the first time it could not install itself correctly. I am sure that all 6 times were counted and scrupulously attributed to the "success" of the OVI Store.

Okay, this grumbling of mine is unconvincing and doesn't prove anything. Let's have a competition. The initial conditions of the competition will be very simple. A brand new application store, accessed from a huge number of Nokia phones, an army of users of these phones. A huge advertising campaign, which in theory was supposed to tell that there is an OVI Store and something can be done with it.

On the other hand, there are 30 Nokia branded stores in Moscow, where you can buy programs and install them right there from the SoftKey catalog. The programs are not unique, they are also present in the OVI Store, the choice of programs is less, which is understandable.

Do you know who won this competition? On the question, it is already clear that OVI Store lost with a devastating score. All marketing communications from Nokia are water poured into the sand in the desert. Efficiency is zero or even below zero. The problem of marketing in this aspect is simple: people do not work for the effectiveness of communications, campaigns, but simply for reporting. We did an OVI Store campaign, it went great, millions of people know about our store, millions of people have seen it. Hooray. And we are not responsible for sales, so let the manager responsible for the OVI Store have this headache, this is his area of ​​​​responsibility. This is how the company lives, resting on its laurels, when efficiency is not at the forefront, and marketing is all about drawing beautiful numbers. The situation is very similar to that at Sony Ericsson a couple of years ago, where everything started with similar bells. It is clear that companies are different in size, but still these are disturbing symptoms of a systemic crisis.

Let's go back to the updated OVI Store, where the developers have left a lot of work for themselves for the next year, so as not to sit idle, so to speak. The first trouble comes from the desire to saturate the store with applications and comments, to show activity, which in fact is not in such a volume. The calculation is correct, but the implementation causes a smirk. The Russian OVI Store has programs from Russian companies with English descriptions. Wow. Where, why, why? The explanation is simple - they do not count on the Russian market and, perhaps, they are right about something. But that doesn't excuse Nokia, which omits such descriptions. This will obviously be fixed, long and hard, spending hundreds of man-hours.

Another funny detail that goes beyond good and evil is the lack of comment moderation. In order not to embarrass someone, I removed the brightest statements, but the remaining screenshots are indicative. But that's not all with the comment system. For some reason, it shows comments in all languages ​​for each program. This was done to create a feeling of extras, look how many people are discussing the program. But the quality of this discussion leaves much to be desired. For example, I went to read about Skype, my first comment in Arabic popped up. There are plenty of those below as well. If at least I read English at the very least, then I don’t read Arabic. I would like to learn, but obviously not to read the comments in the OVI Store.

Let's go further: the comments will now indicate from which phone the person wrote it and, accordingly, on which device he uses the program. For example, Eldar Murtazin wrote a comment about Twitter with the Nokia X6. Attention, question.Why this feature if the store automatically shows only programs that are compatible with your phone? This will create the very confusion when a person, having looked at the comments from the top ten and not finding his phone, begins to doubt whether this program suits him. Does he need her. Why raise such doubts? Just for the sake of such a "cool" feature or a subsequent fix? This is another sign of a systemic crisis - at first, the company does something, and then they begin to think about why they did it and how right it was. It's a pity, but this results in a number of problems, which then affect the perception of the brand.

Do I believe in a bright future for the OVI Store? Not yet. And the reason is simple. I forced myself to study the contents of the store several times in order to download and buy programs for the same Nokia X6. In addition to Gravity did not buy anything. It just doesn't come across anything interesting. For comparison, I picked up my Apple iPod Touch, for which I didn’t buy a lot of applications, I do it sporadically and under the influence of an impulse (I heard about the program, read it, saw it from someone, and so on). Guess how many apps I have purchased? About two dozen and about a dozen free ones or those that you could try like that. I was not too lazy and looked at the account statement to find out how much money I spent on these pleasures. Almost $42 a year.

This is probably why we will continue to be fed data on "record" downloads, the success of individual programs, because for the OVI Store there is no such simple thing as the average check per active customer. More precisely, it is, but the numbers are so scanty that they cause a smile. Personally, I'm willing to give the OVI Store time to make the store better and have more software. How many companies will it take? A year, two, three? I am ready to wait and spend my money in other places, since Nokia apparently does not need this money.

Symbian^3 or don't expect miracles

I often feel like I'm a kid in a candy store when I'm introduced to new devices. Here it is, a new toy, it contains so much pleasure from discovering the unknown. You take a candy in a beautiful package, put it in your mouth ... and instead of a candy - a dusty nasty plastic dummy, which can break your teeth. Can you imagine the feeling? These are the feelings I had from actually getting to know Symbian^3 on several yet unannounced models, which are already quite ready for launch and announcement.

When I was writing a review of the Nokia N97, many of the device's problems were attributed by the company to a prototype, then to an early model, then to something else, I don't even remember. The fact remains: the company has never had such a problematic model with such a price. This is a disaster that even top managers of the company recognize (I wrote about this in Spillikins #56).

Users even began to shoot their videos, in which they scoff at the Nokia N97 advertisement and show its inconsistency with reality. The video turned out to be revealing.

I already wrote about the Symbian^3 interface in some detail, also in Spillikins.

Drum roll. The collision with reality turned out to be excessive for my organism, which had not grown stronger after the winter. This, this is what they call a modern interface and success is predicted, this one? I specially shared oohs about the appearance of the device (we are talking about Vaska, who looks very nice to me) with opinions about the internal stuffing. Because they are two different sides of the same issue. Vaska is the only one, but Symbian^3 is for everyone. So, those who saw the device codenamed "Vaska" (it was also in spy photos in previous Spillikins) noted that it was pleasant, attractive. It depends on the color scheme, but here the designers did their best, the model turned out to be good in appearance. I repeat that if I decide, then in the week I will post a first look at it and a couple of other models.

Now let's move on to the stuffing, that is, the interface, the menu. And then people immediately realize that they have a regular Nokia touchscreen. The comments were different, but in the end they kept asking: “I don’t see what was changed in the interface here.” And I started showing desktops, widgets, one-touch. They looked at me like I was crazy and asked again: “Is this an achievement for Nokia? Make multiple desktops and click in one click? You know, I really don't know what to say to that. I don't know at all. Such an update does not pull on a new version of the OS. It doesn’t pull at all, of course, if you are not a turtle that crawls slowly in the very desert where marketing digs in budgets.

And here you can scold me that at first I myself advocated continuity, but here I advocate some changes, innovations. But, excuse me, there is a classic that is pleasant and good. There are innovations that are needed. The touch S60 is neither classic nor innovative. But only stupefying work on mistakes, the end and edge of which is not visible.

The most ungrateful thing is to evaluate the performance of the OS according to the prototype. But given that there are general trends that have persisted for years in commercial products, when you see them in Symbian^3, you suspect that they will remain in commercial products as well. So, with the active use of the prototype, the desktop crashes, exactly the same story on other touch devices from Nokia. Approximately once every few hours the device “freezes”, this is due to some kind of background activity of the system, I could not find out who was to blame for this. The device is not very fast compared to Android or Bada phones, this is the previous generation. Achievement for Nokia, but within the market average performance. Well, you understood yourself. A beautiful wrapper, and inside - the same dummy. And it's embarrassing as hell. It's time to wake up Nokia, otherwise the place on the podium will have to give way. Competitors are advancing, and very aggressively.

A few words from me or don't blame the mirror

Recently, Nokia has something to criticize for in Spillikins, and in other materials this topic is also touched upon. Often, our readers write letters to me that seem to be written according to the template: “You are right, Nokia is having a bad time. Blah blah blah. I see it too. Blah blah blah. But I think that you can’t write about the company like that, because you are killing their sales, which you have no right to do.”

The meaning of the letters boils down to one thing: the company has problems, and it is necessary to diligently keep silent about them. The maximum is to inform the employees of the company. So, those who have been reading me for many years know that I always inform companies about problems with products, services and other things privately. If such information appears on the pages of the site, on my blog, then this scheme is no longer valid, and the company begins to rush at full speed into the abyss. Of course, this is my assessment of the company's actions. And much smarter people who know perfectly well how and what they do can work in it. Maybe. But the task of the mirror is to reflect the surrounding world, as well as my task is to show what is happening. As soon as Nokia creates a service, a product, a phone that will change our ideas or simply be good, I will write about it, as I always did. But I don’t know how to write that a bad service or product is good, and it’s too late for me to relearn. Nokia marketing employs wonderful people who can agree that one or another journalist will write well about their product. This is their right. As well as my right to show the real state of affairs.Which, however, is fully measured in the same Softkey sales in Nokia stores and sales of the entire OVI Store in Russia. Two big differences - to be or to seem. My desire is for Nokia to be a strong player, not appear to be. Otherwise, the market will be boring without strong competition. The apocalypse will not come, since Nokia has a huge margin of safety. But the company squanders this stock today with extraordinary generosity, which looks like waste. If the situation does not change, then within a few years the problems will become visible, and they will be talked about on every corner. Is it worth bringing the company to this? The question is rhetorical, since Nokia has already lost the 2010 season. There is time to prepare for the next season.

Spillikins №61. Systemic crisis at Nokia or on the edge of the abyss

A lot of news from Nokia, however, it was prompted by the quick announcement of the company's flagship for the second half of 2010, the introduction of Symbian^3 and the opportunity to get acquainted with both on real devices. Disappointment is the weakest description of what I had to face. At the moment, I have not decided yet whether to arrange a preliminary acquaintance with a scattering of new products from Nokia before the official announcement or not. I'll decide in a week, so if photos of N, C, E-series from Nokia with the logo of our resource suddenly crawl around the net, know that I've decided. But let's talk about the disappointment that overtook me this week.

Table:

OVI Store - concept failed, concept changed

A year ago in Barcelona, ​​Nokia launched its own app store with great fanfare. Even before the announcement, I pointed out that the store has certain flaws, it became obvious to everyone in the first months of commercial operation. And the company decided to carry out a soft restart of the OVI Store, which was scheduled for April 2010, a couple of lines about this in the December Spillikins #46. What can be noted, the restart took place, but it did not bring miracles.

Let's step back for a moment and talk about how https://cars45.com.gh/jP09Jj2uJoBMXYWCbjb9EQMx https://cars45.com.gh/jP09Jj2uJoBMXYWCbjb9EQMx Nokia create a representation of S60 or Symbian^3. I don't want to talk about high matters, spaceships, or anything that is beyond the knowledge of the average student. In my opinion, it's time to remember the simplicity of the menu, consistency and unity. For several years, at every meeting with Nokia managers, from ordinary people involved in specific products to top managers responsible for the development of the company, I have said, and written, more than once that the menu in two Nokia phones on the S60 will never does not look like it. The section with office applications can be searched in various places, and for me it turns into flour. Every time you play a guessing game, but where did they put the label on the application this time. Of course, you can spend half an hour on each device and customize everything for yourself. But, excuse me, what prevents the manufacturer from creating a single menu for all S60-based phones, as was done for the S40/S30 platform and as all manufacturers in the world do. I'll explain and clarify. I'm not saying that such and such a menu item, for example, a calculator, must be present in the Office section. Oh no. I'm talking about the fact that if it was placed in the Office, then it should be in this section in all phones. Is it logical? In my opinion, this is the only way to create the continuity of generations, only this way a person who has bought a new device is able to start using it practically with his eyes closed. Why Nokia forgot about it remains a mystery to me. So far, you have to spend time and effort looking for standard applications in different folders.

Do you want more examples of the lack of logic and the inability to organize work inside Nokia? After all, such "little things" are a chronic problem of the company, when one department cannot agree with another what to do and, most importantly, how. Meetings of the working groups go one after another, but apart from the loss of time they do not bring anything. The issue of menu organization is not difficult to implement ideologically, and the people at Nokia themselves understand this. This is the problem of how people within the company agree.

Let's move on with examples. Especially in order to write about the OVI Store update, I decided to get the retired Nokia X6 and update the software on it. For those who are not familiar with the S60, I note that there is a “Software Update” item in the menu, from which, with one touch, the device starts checking for updates and immediately installs them. Conveniently? Yes, definitely. Does it work? Partially. Nokia does not follow uniformity, so one program may be added to this item, and another may be missing. This happened with the OVI Store, the program was not included in the general update, but when the store was launched, a proposal appeared to install a new version. As they say, the company needs to decide whether it wants to install programs and updates from a separate application or each application will update itself. Both approaches have the right to life, but so far there is only confusion and nothing else.

The described problems have absolutely nothing to do with technology, it is a matter of organizing the process. And here Nokia is clearly losing to other players. However, this is also expressed in the way the company spends money lately. Merciless marketing from Nokia burns the company's money only for the sake of reporting, since there is simply no other sense in their activity. For example, knowing that the Russian OVI Store is not very relevant, does not sell anything really, the company launched a massive advertising campaign in December. Someone talks about millions, but I think that the amounts are more modest, but significant. And what was the use of this advertising campaign?

During the week, we managed to get hold of the OVI Store download/sales statistics in different countries and regions of the world. Considering that the company does not officially provide statistics, but only talks about the number of downloads and reports on success, I will not post this confidential document. But I will talk about the tricks that are used to polish reality and show the success of the OVI Store, which are extremely doubtful.

So, on March 23, Nokia's official blog reported that Shazam, the music detection app, had been downloaded over a million times from the OVI Store. And what an achievement, since the application was loaded from 178 countries and so on. You can read the English text here.

Sorry, I didn't download this app from the OVI Store, I had it in a software update for the S60, as did tens of thousands of other people. Let's still decide whether adding a trial version of software in the "Software Update" is analogous to downloading from the OVI Store, where else you need to go, or is it something else. In my opinion, downloading from the OVI Store is treated unambiguously. This is when I go to the OVI Store and consciously download something from there. Not when a company lists an app and I download it hoping to see the full version of the software. By the way, on X6 I downloaded this application through an update about 6 times, from the first time it could not install itself correctly. I am sure that all 6 times were counted and scrupulously attributed to the "success" of the OVI Store.

Okay, this grumbling of mine is unconvincing and doesn't prove anything. Let's have a competition. The initial conditions of the competition will be very simple. A brand new application store, accessed from a huge number of Nokia phones, an army of users of these phones. A huge advertising campaign, which in theory was supposed to tell that there is an OVI Store and something can be done with it.

On the other hand, there are 30 Nokia branded stores in Moscow, where you can buy programs and install them right there from the SoftKey catalog. The programs are not unique, they are also present in the OVI Store, the choice of programs is less, which is understandable.

Do you know who won this competition? On the question, it is already clear that OVI Store lost with a devastating score. All marketing communications from Nokia are water poured into the sand in the desert. Efficiency is zero or even below zero. The problem of marketing in this aspect is simple: people do not work for the effectiveness of communications, campaigns, but simply for reporting. We did an OVI Store campaign, it went great, millions of people know about our store, millions of people have seen it. Hooray. And we are not responsible for sales, so let the manager responsible for the OVI Store have this headache, this is his area of ​​​​responsibility. This is how the company lives, resting on its laurels, when efficiency is not at the forefront, and marketing is engaged in drawing beautiful numbers. The situation is very similar to that at Sony Ericsson a couple of years ago, where everything started with similar bells. It is clear that companies are different in size, but still these are alarming symptoms of a systemic crisis.

Let's go further: the comments will now indicate from which phone the person wrote it and, accordingly, on which device he uses the program. For example, Eldar Murtazin wrote a comment about Twitter with the Nokia X6. Attention, question. Why this feature if the store automatically shows only programs that are compatible with your phone? This will create the very confusion when a person, having looked at the comments from the top ten and not finding his phone, begins to doubt whether this program suits him. Does he need her. Why raise such doubts? Just for the sake of such a "cool" feature or a subsequent fix? This is another sign of a systemic crisis - at first, the company does something, and then they begin to think about why they did it and how right it was. It's a pity, but this results in a number of problems, which then affect the perception of the brand.

Do I believe in a bright future for the OVI Store? Not yet. And the reason is simple. I forced myself to study the contents of the store several times in order to download and buy programs for the same Nokia X6. In addition to Gravity did not buy anything. It just doesn't come across anything interesting. For comparison, I picked up my Apple iPod Touch, for which I didn’t buy a lot of applications, I do it sporadically and under the influence of an impulse (I heard about the program, read it, saw it from someone, and so on). Guess how many apps I have purchased? About two dozen and about a dozen free ones or those that you could try like that. I was not too lazy and looked at the account statement to find out how much money I spent on these pleasures. Almost $42 a year.

This is probably why we will continue to be fed data on "record" downloads, the success of individual programs, because for the OVI Store there is no such simple thing as the average check per active customer. More precisely, it is, but the numbers are so meager that they cause a smile. Personally, I'm willing to give the OVI Store time to make the store better and have more software. How many companies will it take? A year, two, three? I am ready to wait and spend my money in other places, since Nokia apparently does not need this money.

Symbian^3 or don't expect miracles

I often feel like I'm a kid in a candy store when I'm introduced to new devices. Here it is, a new toy, it contains so much pleasure from discovering the unknown. You take a candy in a beautiful package, put it in your mouth ... and instead of a candy - a dusty nasty plastic dummy, which can break your teeth. Can you imagine the feeling? These are the feelings I had from actually getting to know Symbian^3 on several yet unannounced models, which are already quite ready for launch and announcement.

When I was writing a review of the Nokia N97, many of the device's problems were attributed by the company to a prototype, then to an early model, then to something else, I don't even remember. The fact remains that the company has never had such a problematic model with such a price. This is a disaster that even top managers of the company recognize (I wrote about this in Spillikins #56).

Users even began to shoot their videos, in which they scoff at the Nokia N97 advertisement and show its inconsistency with reality. The video turned out to be revealing.

I already wrote about the Symbian^3 interface in some detail, also in Spillikins.

Drum roll. The collision with reality turned out to be excessive for my body, which was not strengthened after the winter. This, this is what they call a modern interface and success is predicted, this one? I specially shared oohs about the appearance of the device (we are talking about Vaska, who looks very nice to me) with opinions about the internal stuffing. Because they are two different sides of the same issue. Vaska is the only one, but Symbian^3 is for everyone. So, those who saw the device codenamed "Vaska" (it was also in spy photos in previous Spillikins) noted that it was pleasant, attractive. It depends on the color scheme, but here the designers did their best, the model turned out to be good in appearance. I repeat that if I decide, then in the week I will post a first look at it and a couple of other models.

Now let's move on to the stuffing, that is, the interface, the menu. And then people immediately realize that they have a regular Nokia touchscreen. The comments were different, but in the end they kept asking: “I don’t see what was changed in the interface here.” And I started showing desktops, widgets, one-touch. They looked at me like I was crazy and asked again: “Is this an achievement for Nokia? Make multiple desktops and click in one click? You know, I really don't know what to say to that. I don't know at all. Such an update does not pull on a new version of the OS. It doesn’t pull at all, of course, if you are not a turtle that crawls slowly in the very desert where marketing digs in budgets.

And here you can scold me that at first I myself advocated continuity, but here I advocate some changes, innovations. But, excuse me, there is a classic that is pleasant and good. There are innovations that are needed. The touch S60 is neither classic nor innovative. But only stupefying work on mistakes, the end and edge of which is not visible.

The most ungrateful thing is to evaluate the performance of the OS according to the prototype. But given that there are general trends that have persisted for years in commercial products, when you see them in Symbian^3, you suspect that they will remain in commercial products as well. So, with the active use of the prototype, the desktop crashes, exactly the same story on other touch devices from Nokia. Approximately once every few hours the device “freezes”, this is due to some kind of background activity of the system, I could not find out who was to blame for this. The device is not very fast compared to Android or Bada phones, this is the previous generation. Achievement for Nokia, but within the market average performance. Well, you understood yourself. A beautiful wrapper, and inside - the same dummy. And it's embarrassing as hell. It's time to wake up Nokia, otherwise the place on the podium will have to give way. Competitors are advancing, and very aggressively.

A few words from me or don't blame the mirror

Recently, Nokia has something to criticize for in Spillikins, and in other materials this topic is also touched upon. Often, our readers write letters to me that seem to be written according to the template: “You are right, Nokia is having a bad time. Blah blah blah. I see it too. Blah blah blah. But I think that you can’t write about the company like that, because you are killing their sales, which you have no right to do.”

The meaning of the letters boils down to one thing: the company has problems, and it is necessary to diligently keep silent about them. The maximum is to inform the employees of the company. So, those who have been reading me for many years know that I always inform companies about problems with products, services and other things privately. If such information appears on the pages of the site, on my blog, then this scheme is no longer valid, and the company begins to rush at full speed into the abyss. Of course, this is my assessment of the company's actions. And much smarter people who know perfectly well how and what they do can work in it. Maybe. But the task of the mirror is to reflect the surrounding world, as well as my task is to show what is happening. As soon as Nokia creates a service, a product, a phone that will change our ideas or simply be good, I will write about it, as I always did. But I don’t know how to write that a bad service or product is good, and it’s too late for me to relearn. Nokia marketing employs wonderful people who can agree that this or that journalist will write well about their product. This is their right. As well as my right to show the real state of affairs. Which, however, is fully measured in the same Softkey sales in Nokia stores and sales of the entire OVI Store in Russia. Two big differences - to be or to seem. My desire is for Nokia to be a strong player, not appear to be. Otherwise, the market will be boring without strong competition. The apocalypse will not come, since Nokia has a huge margin of safety. But the company squanders this stock today with extraordinary generosity, which looks like waste. If the situation does not change, then within a few years the problems will become visible, and they will be talked about on every corner. Is it worth bringing the company to this? The question is rhetorical, since Nokia has already lost the 2010 season. There is time to prepare for the next season.