Service thermometer

We continue the series of publications dedicated to the service (you can read the previous articles here and here). Today we will talk about how you can evaluate the quality of the service center, Gennady Danilov, General Director of the Service.OK service center, will help us understand this issue.

MR: So, Gennady, why isn't everything going smoothly in Russian services? Or rather, why is there a clear stagnation?

G. D. Because the head of each SC, although he sees a number of unresolved problems, understands that his company is within the general level. Each SC has its own strengths and weaknesses. The head of the SC looks at the situation something like this: we have a good SC, maybe even the best. We will solve the problem with acceptance (repair time, number of repetitions, etc., as appropriate) in the near future. And we will be the best. In any case, we are already better than SC "Pupkin", "Tyapkin", "Lyapkin" (again, underline the necessary). The fact that customers complain - well, that's how customers are. And I do not presume to condemn such a leader. While there are no uniform evaluation criteria, rulers for measuring "height at the withers", each SC is the best (in its own coordinate system).

For example, the notorious TAT ​​(time from the moment the device is handed over to the service until it is ready for delivery). I am glad that the time has passed when this was understood as the time of repair. That is, I gave the phone to the master on the 13th at 16:00, received the repaired phone from the master on the 15th at 12:00, we consider TAT less than 3 days. Fine! But the fact that the phone was handed over by the customer on the 1st, as a rule, is not taken into account. Or another example: we calculate the average TAT time per month - we get 16 days. No, it can't be! I see that everyone is working, phones are shipped from repair in bags - everything is fine. We begin to find out, it turns out that 90% of the devices leave the SC in 3-5 days, and 10% freeze for a long time. A strict question should be asked to the head of production:

- Why don't we meet deadlines?!
- So this is... There are no spare parts.
- Why are there no spare parts?!
- Manufacturers delay delivery.
- Ah-ah-ah. Well, then it's understandable!

And the "suspended" devices are deleted from the statistics, and the statistics become "round" and "beautiful". But that doesn't make it any easier for the client. I will make a reservation right away, the examples given have already gone down in history, such cases were at the dawn of the service. Now statistics are being dealt with more professionally. Although this does not mean that at the moment each leader knows the true picture in his SC, and even more so he can hardly compare it with the statistics of another SC. The manufacturer, receiving reports from his SC, of ​​course, can compare them. But there is just a catch here. The manufacturer compares REPORTS.

What conclusion should the manufacturer draw from receiving such a document?

< td>16 < td>20

Repaired ST "A" ST "B"< /td> SC "B" SC "G"
Model 1 9 20 5
Model 2 15 25 20 10
Model 3 32 20< /td> 20 10
Model 4 5 1 20 15
Model 5 14 20 10

SC "B" works best of all - it has the most repairs.

SC "B" deals with postscripts - it even had 20 repairs on a rare model 4.

MR: Which option do you choose?

G. D: I am not ready to answer yet, there is not enough information. But let's try to dig deeper - what is their TAT:

As you can see, the leader has changed. Now it is SC "B". But something else is interesting: why do SCs "A" and "B" have such long terms? Arranged by day:

ST "A" ST "B" ST "C" ST "G"
TAT, days 14 3 14 7
ST "A" ST "B" ST " V" SC "G"
Less than 1 day 15% 0% 5% 10%
1 < t < 3 15% 100% 10% 20%
3 < t < 7 20%< /td> 0% 55% 20%
t > 7 50% 0% 20% 50%

Our leader has changed, but it's hard to believe that all devices are serviced stably in 3 days.

The topic can be continued by decomposing the repair period by model, looking at the availability of spare parts for this model. But , I assure you, from a more detailed study of statistics, the overall impression will only become more vague. Only outrageous facts can be caught. For example, with an equal number of repaired phones of the same model in different SCs in one SC, the consumption is 40 times higher, well, let's say, a 3A fuse (hello to those who recognize themselves). But tell me, how many people want to sit and double-check the consumption of spare parts? Next, you can add characteristics such as:

- this SC does everything quickly and efficiently, if there are spare parts. Only this SC does not like to order spare parts / cannot;
- in this SC there are spare parts, and they seem to be doing well, but there is no normal website, they don’t answer e-mail, it’s unrealistic to get through on the phone - it turns out like in a joke about a partisan: “What, the war has already ended?”

I can go on and on with these examples, but what has been said is enough to understand that service centers are evaluated at the level of sensations.

MR: So what to do?

G. D.: Make a rating yourself, develop a rating system, conduct tests of the SC.

MR: ...and end up getting another reproach for biased conclusions...

G. D: Of course! How could it be without it. But reproaches are reproaches, and if MR manages to create a rating system that is understandable to professionals and with which they agree at least 60%, then a tool will appear by which all SCs can adjust their activities. For example, SC "Pupkin" received a final grade of 70 points, and he had a failed discipline (for example, the work of the help desk) - there is a reason to pay attention to this service.

MR: Will SC representatives watch this rating.

G. D: Of course they will. All SCs are jealous of each other. Only while there are no criteria, everyone considers himself the best. For example, I argue that our SC is the best - try to refute it.

MR: So you just appeared on the market.

G. D: Exactly. With our small volumes of repairs, it is easy to do everything quickly and efficiently - we have the best TAT on the market, there are no complaints about us at all.

MR: Yes, it's hard to argue.

G. D: Seriously, a discussion has already begun on the forum on evaluating the quality of service, and I have already published one thought, sorry for the autoplagiarism. So, I like the warm weather that has settled in Moscow these days. But for some reason, many people call it heat. But without a thermometer, we will not be able to assess the situation adequately. I propose to create a thermometer for the service, even if it is inaccurate at first.

In the next article we will talk about the premises for the service center.

You can discuss this material here.

Interviewed by Sergey Zavatsky
Published on June 27, 2006

Service thermometer

We continue the series of publications dedicated to the service (you can read the previous articles here and here). Today we will talk about how you can evaluate the quality of the service center, Gennady Danilov, General Director of the Service.OK service center, will help us understand this issue.

MR: So, Gennady, why isn't everything going smoothly in Russian services? Or rather, why is there a clear stagnation?

G. D. Because the head of each SC, although he sees a number of unresolved problems, understands that his company is within the general level. Each SC has its own strengths and weaknesses. The head of the SC looks at the situation something like this: we have a good SC, maybe even the best. We will solve the problem with acceptance (repair time, number of repetitions, etc., as appropriate) in the near future. And we will be the best. In any case, we are already better than SC "Pupkin", "Tyapkin", "Lyapkin" (again, underline the necessary). The fact that customers complain - well, that's how customers are. And I do not presume to condemn such a leader. While there are no uniform evaluation criteria, rulers for measuring "height at the withers", each SC is the best (in its own coordinate system).

For example, the notorious TAT ​​(time from the moment the device is handed over to the service until it is ready for delivery). I am glad that the time has passed when this was understood as the time of repair. That is, I gave the phone to the master on the 13th at 16:00, received the repaired phone from the master on the 15th at 12:00, we consider TAT less than 3 days. Fine! But the fact that the phone was handed over by the customer on the 1st, as a rule, is not taken into account. Or another example: we calculate the average TAT time per month - we get 16 days. No, it can't be! I see that everyone is working, phones are shipped from repair in bags - everything is fine. We begin to find out, it turns out that 90% of the devices leave the SC in 3-5 days, and 10% freeze for a long time. A strict question should be asked to the head of production:

- Why don't we meet deadlines?!
- So this is... There are no spare parts.
- Why are there no spare parts?!
- Manufacturers delay delivery.
- Ah-ah-ah. Well, then it's understandable!

And the "suspended" devices are deleted from the statistics, and the statistics become "round" and "beautiful". But that doesn't make it any easier for the client. I will make a reservation right away, the examples given have already gone down in history, such cases were at the dawn of the service. Now statistics are being dealt with more professionally. Although this does not mean that at the moment each leader knows the true picture in his SC, and even more so he can hardly compare it with the statistics of another SC. The manufacturer, receiving reports from his SC, of ​​course, can compare them. But there is just a catch here. The manufacturer compares REPORTS.

What conclusion should the manufacturer draw from receiving such a document?

< td>16 < td>20

Repaired ST "A" ST "B"< /td> SC "B" SC "G"
Model 1 9 20 5
Model 2 15 25 20 10
Model 3 32 20< /td> 20 10
Model 4 5 1 20 15
Model 5 14 20 10

SC "B" works best of all - it has the most repairs.

SC "B" deals with postscripts - it even had 20 repairs on a rare model 4.

MR: Which option do you choose?

G. D: I am not ready to answer yet, there is not enough information. But let's try to dig deeper - what is their TAT:

As you can see, the leader has changed. Now it is SC "B". But something else is interesting: why do SCs "A" and "B" have such long terms? Arranged by day:

ST "A" ST "B" ST "C" ST "G"
TAT, days 14 3 14 7
ST "A" ST "B" ST " V" SC "G"
Less than 1 day 15% 0% 5% 10%
1 < t < 3 15% 100% 10% 20%
3 < t < 7 20%< /td> 0% 55% 20%
t > 7 50% 0% 20% 50%

Our leader has changed, but it's hard to believe that all devices are serviced stably in 3 days.

The topic can be continued by decomposing the repair period by model, looking at the availability of spare parts for this model. But , I assure you, from a more detailed study of statistics, the overall impression will only become more vague. Only outrageous facts can be caught. For example, with an equal number of repaired phones of the same model in different SCs in one SC, the consumption is 40 times higher, well, let's say, a 3A fuse (hello to those who recognize themselves). But tell me, how many people want to sit and double-check the consumption of spare parts? Next, you can add characteristics such as:

- this SC does everything quickly and efficiently, if there are spare parts. Only this SC does not like to order spare parts / cannot;
- in this SC there are spare parts, and they seem to be doing well, but there is no normal website, they don’t answer e-mail, it’s unrealistic to get through on the phone - it turns out like in a joke about a partisan: “What, the war has already ended?”

I can go on and on with these examples, but what has been said is enough to understand that service centers are evaluated at the level of sensations.

MR: So what to do?

G. D.: Make a rating yourself, develop a rating system, conduct tests of the SC.

MR: ...and end up getting another reproach for biased conclusions...

G. D: Of course! How could it be without it. But reproaches are reproaches, and if MR manages to create a rating system that is understandable to professionals and with which they agree at least 60%, then a tool will appear by which all SCs can adjust their activities. For example, SC "Pupkin" received a final grade of 70 points, and he had a failed discipline (for example, the work of the help desk) - there is a reason to pay attention to this service.

MR: Will SC representatives watch this rating.

G. D: Of course they will. All SCs are jealous of each other. Only while there are no criteria, everyone considers himself the best. For example, I argue that our SC is the best - try to refute it.

MR: So you just appeared on the market.

G. D: Exactly. With our small volumes of repairs, it is easy to do everything quickly and efficiently - we have the best TAT on the market, there are no complaints about us at all.

MR: Yes, it's hard to argue.

G. D: Seriously, a discussion has already begun on the forum on evaluating the quality of service, and I have already published one thought, sorry for the autoplagiarism. So, I like the warm weather that has settled in Moscow these days. But for some reason, many people call it heat. But without a thermometer, we will not be able to assess the situation adequately. I propose to create a thermometer for the service, even if it is inaccurate at first.

In the next article we will talk about the premises for the service center.

You can discuss this material here.

Interviewed by Sergey Zavatsky
Published on June 27, 2006

Service thermometer

We continue the series of publications dedicated to the service (you can read the previous articles here and here). Today we will talk about how you can evaluate the quality of the service center, Gennady Danilov, General Director of the Service.OK service center, will help us understand this issue.

MR: So, Gennady, why isn't everything going smoothly in Russian services? Or rather, why is there a clear stagnation?

G. D. Because the head of each SC, although he sees a number of unresolved problems, understands that his company is within the general level. Each SC has its own strengths and weaknesses. The head of the SC looks at the situation something like this: we have a good SC, maybe even the best. We will solve the problem with acceptance (repair time, number of repetitions, etc., as appropriate) in the near future. And we will be the best. In any case, we are already better than SC "Pupkin", "Tyapkin", "Lyapkin" (again, underline the necessary). The fact that customers complain - well, that's how customers are. And I do not presume to condemn such a leader. While there are no uniform evaluation criteria, rulers for measuring "height at the withers", each SC is the best (in its own coordinate system).

For example, the notorious TAT ​​(time from the moment the device is handed over to the service until it is ready for delivery). I am glad that the time has passed when this was understood as the time of repair. That is, I gave the phone to the master on the 13th at 16:00, received the repaired phone from the master on the 15th at 12:00, we consider TAT less than 3 days. Fine! But the fact that the phone was handed over by the customer on the 1st, as a rule, is not taken into account. Or another example: we calculate the average TAT time per month - we get 16 days. No, it can't be! I see that everyone is working, phones are shipped from repair in bags - everything is fine. We begin to find out, it turns out that 90% of the devices leave the SC in 3-5 days, and 10% freeze for a long time. A strict question should be asked to the head of production:

- Why don't we meet deadlines?!
- So this is... There are no spare parts.
- Why are there no spare parts?!
- Manufacturers delay delivery.
- Ah-ah-ah. Well, then it's understandable!

And the "suspended" devices are deleted from the statistics, and the statistics become "round" and "beautiful". But that doesn't make it any easier for the client. I will make a reservation right away, the examples given have already gone down in history, such cases were at the dawn of the service. Now statistics are being dealt with more professionally. Although this does not mean that at the moment each leader knows the true picture in his SC, and even more so he can hardly compare it with the statistics of another SC. The manufacturer, receiving reports from his SC, of ​​course, can compare them. But there is just a catch here. The manufacturer compares REPORTS.

What conclusion should the manufacturer draw from receiving such a document?

< td>16 < td>20

Repaired ST "A" ST "B"< /td> SC "B" SC "G"
Model 1 9 20 5
Model 2 15 25 20 10
Model 3 32 20< /td> 20 10
Model 4 5 1 20 15
Model 5 14 20 10

SC "B" works best of all - it has the most repairs.

SC "B" deals with postscripts - it even had 20 repairs on a rare model 4.

MR: Which option do you choose?

G. D: I am not ready to answer yet, there is not enough information. But let's try to dig deeper - what is their TAT:

As you can see, the leader has changed. Now it is SC "B". But something else is interesting: why do SCs "A" and "B" have such long terms? Arranged by day:

ST "A" ST "B" ST "C" ST "G"
TAT, days 14 3 14 7
ST "A" ST "B" ST " V" SC "G"
Less than 1 day 15% 0% 5% 10%
1 < t < 3 15% 100% 10% 20%
3 < t < 7 20%< /td> 0% 55% 20%
t > 7 50% 0% 20% 50%

Our leader has changed, but it's hard to believe that all devices are serviced stably in 3 days.

The topic can be continued by decomposing the repair period by model, looking at the availability of spare parts for this model. But , I assure you, from a more detailed study of statistics, the overall impression will only become more vague. Only outrageous facts can be caught. For example, with an equal number of repaired phones of the same model in different SCs in one SC, the consumption is 40 times higher, well, let's say, a 3A fuse (hello to those who recognize themselves). But tell me, how many people want to sit and double-check the consumption of spare parts? Next, you can add characteristics such as:

- this SC does everything quickly and efficiently, if there are spare parts. Only this SC does not like to order spare parts / cannot;
- in this SC there are spare parts, and they seem to be doing well, but there is no normal website, they don’t answer e-mail, it’s unrealistic to get through on the phone - it turns out like in a joke about a partisan: “What, the war has already ended?”

I can go on and on with these examples, but what has been said is enough to understand that service centers are evaluated at the level of sensations.

MR: So what to do?

G. D.: Make a rating yourself, develop a rating system, conduct tests of the SC.

MR: ...and end up getting another reproach for biased conclusions...

G. D: Of course! How could it be without it. But reproaches are reproaches, and if MR manages to create a rating system that is understandable to professionals and with which they agree at least 60%, then a tool will appear by which all SCs can adjust their activities. For example, SC "Pupkin" received a final grade of 70 points, and he had a failed discipline (for example, the work of the help desk) - there is a reason to pay attention to this service.

MR: Will SC representatives watch this rating.

G. D: Of course they will. All SCs are jealous of each other. Only while there are no criteria, everyone considers himself the best. For example, I argue that our SC is the best - try to refute it.

MR: So you've only just entered the market.

G. D: Exactly. With our small volume of repairs, it is easy to do everything quickly and efficiently - we have the best TAT on the market, there are no complaints about us at all.

MR: Yes, it's hard to argue.

G. D: Seriously, a discussion has already begun on the forum on evaluating the quality of service, and I have already published one thought, sorry for autoplagiarism. So, I like the warm weather that has settled in Moscow these days. But for some reason, many people call it heat. But without a thermometer, we will not be able to assess the situation adequately. I propose to create a thermometer for the service, even if it is inaccurate at first.

In the next article we will talk about the premises for the service center.

You can discuss this material here.

Interviewed by Sergey Zavatsky
Published on June 27, 2006

Service thermometer

We continue the series of publications dedicated to the service (you can read the previous articles here and here). Today we will talk about how you can evaluate the quality of the service center, Gennady Danilov, General Director of the Service.OK service center, will help us understand this issue.

MR: So, Gennady, why isn't everything going smoothly in Russian services? Rather, why is there a clear stagnation?

G. D. Because the head of each SC, although he sees a number of unresolved problems, understands that his company is within the general level. Each SC has its own strengths and weaknesses. The head of the SC looks at the situation something like this: we have a good SC, maybe even the best. We will solve the problem with acceptance (repair time, number of repetitions, etc., as appropriate) in the near future. And we will be the best. In any case, we are already better than SC "Pupkin", "Tyapkin", "Lyapkin" (again, underline the necessary). The fact that customers complain - well, that's how customers are. And I do not presume to condemn such a leader. While there are no uniform evaluation criteria, rulers for measuring "height at the withers", each SC is the best (in its own coordinate system).

For example, the notorious TAT ​​(time from the moment the device is handed over to the service until it is ready for delivery). I am glad that the time has passed when this was understood as the time of repair. That is, I gave the phone to the master on the 13th at 16:00, received the repaired phone from the master on the 15th at 12:00, we consider TAT less than 3 days. Fine! But the fact that the phone was handed over by the customer on the 1st, as a rule, is not taken into account. Or another example: we calculate the average TAT time per month - we get 16 days. No, it can't be! I see that everyone is working, phones are shipped from repair in bags - everything is fine. We begin to find out, it turns out that 90% of the devices leave the SC in 3-5 days, and 10% freeze for a long time. A strict question should be asked to the head of production:

- Why don't we meet deadlines?! - So this is ... There are no spare parts. Why are there no spare parts? - Producers delay delivery. - Aaaa. Well, then it's understandable!

And the "suspended" devices are deleted from the statistics, and the statistics become "round" and "beautiful". But that doesn't make it any easier for the client. I will make a reservation right away, the examples given have already gone down in history, such cases were at the dawn of the service. Now statistics are being dealt with more professionally. Although this does not mean that at the moment each leader knows the true picture in his SC, and even more so he can hardly compare it with the statistics of another SC. The manufacturer, receiving reports from his SC, of ​​course, can compare them. But there is just a catch here. The manufacturer compares REPORTS.

What conclusion should the manufacturer draw from receiving such a document?

Repaired SC "A" SC "B" SC "C" SC "D" Model 1 9 16 20 5 Model 2 15 25 20 10 Model 3 32 20 20 10 Model 4 5 1 20 15 Model 5 14 20 20 10

SC "B" works best of all - it has the most repairs.

SC "B" deals with postscripts - it even had 20 repairs on a rare model 4.

MR: Which option do you choose?

G. D: I am not ready to answer yet, there is not enough information. But let's try to dig deeper - what is their TAT:

SC "A" SC "B" SC "C" SC "D" TAT, days 14 3 14 7

As you can see, the leader has changed. Now it is SC "B". But something else is interesting: why do SCs "A" and "B" have such long terms? Arranged by day:

SP "A" ST "B" ST "C" ST "D" Less than 1 day 15% 0% 5% 10% 1 < t < 3 15% 100% 10% 20% 3 < t < 7 20% 0% 55% 20% t > 7 50% 0% 20% 50%

Our leader has changed, but it's hard to believe that all devices are serviced stably in 3 days.

The topic can be continued by decomposing the repair period by model, looking at the availability of spare parts for this model. But, I assure you, from a more detailed study of statistics, the overall impression will only become more vague. Only outrageous facts can be caught. For example, with an equal number of repaired phones of the same model in different SCs in one SC, the consumption is 40 times higher, well, let's say, a 3A fuse (hello to those who recognize themselves). But tell me, how many people want to sit and double-check the consumption of spare parts? Next, you can add characteristics such as:

The topic can be continued by expanding the repair period by model, looking at the availability of spare parts for this model. But , I assure you, from a more detailed study of statistics, the overall impression will only become more vague. Only outrageous facts can be caught. For example, with an equal number of repaired phones of the same model in different SCs in one SC, the consumption is 40 times higher, well, let's say, a 3A fuse (hello to those who recognize themselves). But tell me, how many people want to sit and double-check the consumption of spare parts? Next, you can add features such as:

- this SC does everything quickly and efficiently, if there are spare parts. Only this SC does not like to order spare parts / cannot; - this SC also has spare parts, and they seem to do it well, but there is no normal website, they don’t answer e-mail, it’s unrealistic to get through by phone - it turns out like in a joke about a partisan: “What, the war has already ended?”

I can go on and on with these examples, but what has been said is enough to understand that service centers are evaluated at the level of sensations.

MR: So what to do?

G. D.: Make a rating yourself, develop a rating system, conduct tests of the SC.

MR: ...and end up getting another reproach for biased conclusions...

G. D: Of course! How could it be without it. But reproaches are reproaches, and if MR manages to create a rating system that is understandable to professionals and with which they agree at least 60%, then a tool will appear by which all SCs can adjust their activities. For example, SC "Pupkin" received a final grade of 70 points, and he had a failed discipline (for example, the work of the help desk) - there is a reason to pay attention to this service.

MR: Will representatives of the SC watch this rating.

G. D: Of course they will. All SCs are jealous of each other. Only while there are no criteria, everyone considers himself the best. For example, I argue that our SC is the best - try to refute it.

MR: So you just appeared on the market.

G. D: Exactly. With our small volumes of repairs, it is easy to do everything quickly and efficiently - we have the best TAT on the market, there are no complaints about us at all.

MR: Yes, it's hard to argue.

G. D: Seriously, a discussion has already begun on the forum on evaluating the quality of service, and I have already published one thought, sorry for the autoplagiarism. So, I like the warm weather that has settled in Moscow these days. But for some reason, many people call it heat. But without a thermometer, we will not be able to assess the situation adequately. I propose to create a thermometer for the service, even if it is inaccurate at first.

In the next article we will talk about the premises for the service center.

You can discuss this material here.

Interviewed by Sergei Zavatsky Published on June 27, 2006