Mobile environment #33. Wi-Fi in the subway

The New Year holidays are over, and we are returning to our usual working hours, however, due to CES 2015, the Mobile-Review team continued to work all last week. The exhibition itself turned out to be relatively boring, however, in my opinion, they say so about CES every year. In any case, CES is over, and we are moving on to more interesting topics.

Wi-Fi in the subway. What is "good" and what is "bad"?

I'll start with some statistics. On average, a person working/studying in Moscow spends about an hour and a half every working day in the metro. This is a pretty decent time, 7.5 hours a week, and 30 hours a month. It turns out that we spend one of the 30 days of the month in the subway. Amazing and a bit scary statistic, isn't it?

However, I think that many have already come to terms with this fact and have learned to either "kill" this time, or spend it usefully. For me, trips to the metro are always connected with curiosity: to see how people pass the time, what gadgets they use, what games they play, what e-books they read from. Actually, it was in the subway that I began to notice how Nokia ringtones were gradually replaced by piano parts from various Galaxy. In general, the Moscow metro can be just a mine of information for someone who knows what to look for.

But that's not what I wanted to talk about today. Even before the New Year, information began to appear massively on the network about how you can skip the vmetro start page and immediately start using the Internet. In short, this uses a special application that is not available in the Play Store, however, Android allows you to install third-party programs using a simple apk file. I will not describe the installation procedure and give links to the application itself, below you will understand why.

Five or six years ago, the very idea that the subway could have stable and fairly fast Wi-Fi (yes, it also has problems, it’s not worth idealizing Wi-Fi in the subway) was something out of the field fiction, and if users were offered such a service even for a small monthly fee, they would gladly use it. Now such Wi-Fi is provided to all metro users free of charge. All that is required of you is to go through the authorization form (in fact, just click on the "Login" button) and log in to the vmet.ro start page. After that, Internet access is open. In addition, every five minutes you will see an advertising banner in the browser, which closes with one tap. In my opinion, these are quite fair conditions for free use of Wi-Fi throughout the metro.

But no, some users are too lazy to even perform a few simple steps, and they are trying to find a way to bypass authorization in order to immediately use the Internet. Why can't this be done? To better understand how the project is monetized and how MaximaTelecom obtained the rights to build Wi-Fi networks in the metro, below I will give a comment from a company representative:

A tender was held for the construction of a free Wi-Fi network in the Moscow Metro. We, the MaximaTelecom company, won this tender, after which we started construction. The network is built only on own and borrowed funds. The investment budget is 1.8 billion rubles. No budgetary funds are attracted for the implementation of this project.

For users, the Wi-Fi network on all lines is available completely free of charge. Advertising is placed on the vmet.ro portal, due to which the network is monetized. Various services are also available on the portal, for example, the purchase of tickets or goods, from which we also receive a certain percentage.

As you can see, monetization of the project occurs primarily through advertising. Ads that some users try to cut or remove. It's not a very fair situation. In essence, the consumer uses free Wi-Fi, but for the company it does not pay off due to the use of stub programs.

For me, this question is very fundamental, because Mobile-Review (like most other IT publications) is funded by advertising. This allows users to read all the articles on the site for free, and the authors to devote their main time to the site. The use of a banner cutter on any site is a disrespect for the work of its creators and authors. And I just once again would like to emphasize this to the attention of readers using similar stub applications or AdBlock. We often have arguments with some of the commenters talking about annoying ads. Like, enter subscriptions, we will pay with pleasure. However, in most cases, nothing goes beyond words, and even if we had subscriptions, most likely, these same users would use the free advertising option.

A movie session for 100 rubles, expensive or cheap?

During our third year, we had days when classes started in the afternoon. On such days we met with friends in the morning and went to the cinema. The fact is that tickets for the morning session then cost 50-70 rubles per person. As a bonus, you received an almost empty room. I remember that at the last part of "Harry Potter" we were the only spectators at all. It was quite fun: we commented on the entire film and did not bother anyone (by the way, usually I am against comments in cinemas).

And recently we met with a friend and again decided to go to the morning movie session. Tickets have risen in price a little (100 rubles per film), but the price still looks low.

After watching the film, I went home and thought that this is amazing: for 100 rubles you can watch a full-fledged high-quality film on the big screen. I think this is a very low price. However, people are ready to spend both 300 and 500 rubles on cinema, this is not something surprising.

But when it comes to buying or renting movies at home, those same people howl wildly, "I already paid for that movie at the theater!" "What if I don't like the movie?" “Yes, I’d rather download from torrents!” And this wording is my favorite: “Am I, a fool or something, to buy films??”

But, it would seem, what is the difference between renting a house and going to the cinema? Yes, you may not have a cool TV or expensive acoustics, but Skin Care Products in East Legon there will be no annoying neighbors, and if you itch to go to the toilet, then the film can be paused. In my opinion, the problem here is not only the greed of consumers, but also the scarce assortment of such services. Even Play Movies and the iTunes Store don't have a great selection of movies.

Issue-free return or used item purchase?

In one of my Friday columns, I talked about the idea of ​​renting a mobile phone before buying one. Commentators then reasonably noted that why pay for rent, if you can buy a smartphone, use it, and if you don’t like it, return it. Indeed, now even large retailers (MVideo, Know-How) offer a hassle-free return within 30 days. However, in fact, this leads us to one of two scenarios. In the first case, the user really accepts the equipment without any problems, only then it is sent back to the shelves, and you can stumble upon a used product that is under the guise of a new one. In the second case, they only tell you about a hassle-free return, and in the end they give you a turn from the gate. This is also a fairly common practice.

Personally, it is difficult for me to decide what is more important for me - to buy a completely new product or to be sure that I can always return it without any problems. If I look back at our stores, I like the IKEA experience most of all, when furniture is accepted for return without any problems, and then it is in the discounted goods section, this model looks fair, but is hardly feasible in large chains.

Russian language on readers in Amazon

In the last two or three months I haven't had time to read fiction at all, so this news cannot be called the most relevant. But recently I turned on my Paperwhite, found that it managed to update itself, and decided to look at ChangeLog, in which I was surprised to find support for the Russian language! And although Kindle owners are already aware of the update, potential buyers may not know about it.

For example, my colleague, Roman Belykh, when choosing an e-book for his wife, insisted that it must have support for the Russian language, and the Kindle that was suitable in other respects was eventually excluded from the list.

I remind you that the Russian language appeared not only in the menu, but also in dictionaries, and this is very cool.

Conclusion

A test quiz has recently appeared on Meduza, designed to show how similar the design of modern smartphones is. Readers were asked to determine the name of the model only by the image of its front side. The entire IT community immediately began to retweet their results and brag that they had guessed all ten devices. To be honest, I made a mistake in one of the models. However, to brag about the results of this test is at least strange. It's like a dentist will be proud to answer all the questions of a simple quiz about teeth. We have been working with you for a long time or are interested in the IT industry, so such tests are not a problem for us. But how many correct answers would an ordinary consumer have, this is a big question.

Mobile environment #33. Wi-Fi in the subway

The New Year holidays are over, and we are returning to our usual working hours, however, due to CES 2015, the Mobile-Review team continued to work all last week. The exhibition itself turned out to be relatively boring, however, in my opinion, they say so about CES every year. In any case, CES is over, and we are moving on to more interesting topics.

Wi-Fi in the subway. What is "good" and what is "bad"?

I'll start with some statistics. On average, a person working/studying in Moscow spends about an hour and a half every working day in the metro. This is a pretty decent time, 7.5 hours a week, and 30 hours a month. It turns out that we spend one of the 30 days of the month in the subway. Amazing and a bit scary statistic, isn't it?

However, I think that many have already come to terms with this fact and have learned to either "kill" this time, or spend it usefully. For me, trips to the metro are always connected with curiosity: to see how people pass the time, what gadgets they use, what games they play, what e-books they read from. Actually, it was in the subway that I began to notice how Nokia ringtones were gradually replaced by piano parts from various Galaxy. In general, the Moscow metro can be just a mine of information for someone who knows what to look for.

But that's not what I wanted to talk about today. Even before the New Year, information began to appear massively on the network about how you can skip the vmetro start page and immediately start using the Internet. In short, this uses a special application that is not available in the Play Store, however, Android allows you to install third-party programs using a simple apk file. I will not describe the installation procedure and give links to the application itself, below you will understand why.

Five or six years ago, the very idea that the subway could have stable and fairly fast Wi-Fi (yes, it also has problems, it’s not worth idealizing Wi-Fi in the subway) was something out of the field fiction, and if users were offered such a service even for a small monthly fee, they would gladly use it. Now such Wi-Fi is provided to all metro users free of charge. All that is required of you is to go through the authorization form (in fact, just click on the "Login" button) and log in to the vmet.ro start page. After that, Internet access is open. In addition, every five minutes you will see an advertising banner in the browser, which closes with one tap. In my opinion, these are quite fair conditions for free use of Wi-Fi throughout the metro.

But no, some users are too lazy to even perform a few simple steps, and they are trying to find a way to bypass authorization in order to immediately use the Internet. Why can't this be done? To better understand how the project is monetized and how MaximaTelecom obtained the rights to build Wi-Fi networks in the metro, below I will give a comment from a company representative:

A tender was held for the construction of a free Wi-Fi network in the Moscow Metro. We, the MaximaTelecom company, won this tender, after which we started construction. The network is built only on own and borrowed funds. The investment budget is 1.8 billion rubles. No budgetary funds are attracted for the implementation of this project.

For users, the Wi-Fi network on all lines is available completely free of charge. Advertising is placed on the vmet.ro portal, due to which the network is monetized. Various services are also available on the portal, for example, the purchase of tickets or goods, from which we also receive a certain percentage.

As you can see, monetization of the project occurs primarily through advertising. Ads that some users try to cut or remove. It's not a very fair situation. In essence, the consumer uses free Wi-Fi, but for the company it does not pay off due to the use of stub programs.

For me, this question is very fundamental, because Mobile-Review (like most other IT publications) is funded by advertising. This allows users to read all the articles on the site for free, and the authors to devote their main time to the site. The use of a banner cutter on any site is a disrespect for the work of its creators and authors. And I just once again would like to emphasize this to the attention of readers using such stub applications or AdBlock. We often have arguments with some of the commenters talking about annoying ads. Like, enter subscriptions, we will pay with pleasure. However, in most cases, nothing goes beyond words, and even if we had subscriptions, most likely, these same users would use the free advertising option.

A movie session for 100 rubles, expensive or cheap?

During our third year, we had days when classes started in the afternoon. On such days, we met with friends in the morning and went to the cinema. The fact is that tickets for the morning session then cost 50-70 rubles per person. As a bonus, you received an almost empty room. I remember that at the last part of "Harry Potter" we were the only spectators at all. It was quite fun: we commented on the entire film and did not bother anyone (by the way, usually I am against comments in cinemas).

And recently we met with a friend and again decided to go to the morning movie session. Tickets have risen in price a little (100 rubles per film), but the price still looks low.

After watching the film, I went home and thought that this is amazing: for 100 rubles you can watch a full-fledged high-quality film on the big screen. I think this is a very low price. However, people are ready to spend both 300 and 500 rubles on the cinema, this is not something surprising.

But when it comes to buying or renting movies at home, those same people howl wildly, "I already paid for that movie at the theater!" "What if I don't like the movie?" “Yes, I’d rather download from torrents!” And this wording is my favorite: “Am I, a fool or something, to buy films??”

But, it would seem, what is the difference between renting a house and going to the cinema? Yes, you may not have a cool TV or expensive acoustics, but Skin Care Products in East Legon there will be no annoying neighbors, and if you itch to go to the toilet, then the film can be paused. In my opinion, the problem here is not only the greed of consumers, but also the scarce assortment of such services. Even Play Movies and the iTunes Store don't have a great selection of movies.

Issue-free return or used item purchase?

In one of my Friday columns, I talked about the idea of ​​renting a mobile phone before buying one. Commentators then reasonably noted that why pay for rent, if you can buy a smartphone, use it, and if you don’t like it, return it. Indeed, now even large retailers (MVideo, Know-How) offer a hassle-free return within 30 days. However, in fact, this leads us to one of two scenarios. In the first case, the user really accepts the equipment without any problems, only then it is sent back to the shelves, and you can stumble upon a used product that is under the guise of a new one. In the second case, they only tell you about a hassle-free return, and in the end they give you a turn from the gate. This is also a fairly common practice.

Personally, it is difficult for me to decide what is more important for me - to buy a completely new product or to be sure that I can always return it without any problems. If I look back at our stores, I like the IKEA experience most of all, when furniture is accepted for return without any problems, and then it is in the discounted goods section, this model looks fair, but is hardly feasible in large chains.

Russian language on readers in Amazon

In the last two or three months I haven't had time to read fiction at all, so this news cannot be called the most relevant. But recently I turned on my Paperwhite, found that it managed to update itself, and decided to look at ChangeLog, in which I was surprised to find support for the Russian language! And although Kindle owners are already aware of the update, potential buyers may not know about it.

For example, my colleague, Roman Belykh, when choosing an e-book for his wife, insisted that it must have support for the Russian language, and the Kindle that was suitable in other respects was eventually excluded from the list.

I remind you that the Russian language appeared not only in the menu, but also in dictionaries, and this is very cool.

Conclusion

A test quiz has recently appeared on Meduza, designed to show how similar the design of modern smartphones is. Readers were asked to determine the name of the model only by the image of its front side. The entire IT community immediately began to retweet their results and brag that they had guessed all ten devices. To be honest, I made a mistake in one of the models. However, to brag about the results of this test is at least strange. It's like a dentist will be proud to answer all the questions of a simple quiz about teeth. We have been working with you for a long time or are interested in the IT industry, so such tests are not a problem for us. But how many correct answers would an ordinary consumer have, this is a big question.

Mobile environment #33. Wi-Fi in the subway

The New Year holidays are over, and we are returning to our usual working hours, however, due to CES 2015, the Mobile-Review team continued to work all last week. The exhibition itself turned out to be relatively boring, however, in my opinion, they say so about CES every year. In any case, CES is over, and we are moving on to more interesting topics.

Wi-Fi in the subway. What is "good" and what is "bad"?

I'll start with some statistics. On average, a person working/studying in Moscow spends about an hour and a half every working day in the metro. This is a pretty decent time, 7.5 hours a week, and 30 hours a month. It turns out that we spend one of the 30 days of the month in the subway. Amazing and a bit scary statistic, isn't it?

However, I think that many have already come to terms with this fact and have learned to either "kill" this time, or spend it usefully. For me, trips to the metro are always connected with curiosity: to see how people pass the time, what gadgets they use, what games they play, what e-books they read from. Actually, it was in the subway that I began to notice how Nokia ringtones were gradually replaced by piano parts from various Galaxy. In general, the Moscow metro can be just a mine of information for someone who knows what to look for.

But that's not what I wanted to talk about today. Even before the New Year, information began to appear massively on the network about how you can skip the vmetro start page and immediately start using the Internet. In short, this uses a special application that is not available in the Play Store, however, Android allows you to install third-party programs using a simple apk file. I will not describe the installation procedure and give links to the application itself, below you will understand why.

Five or six years ago, the very idea that the subway could have stable and fairly fast Wi-Fi (yes, it also has problems, it’s not worth idealizing Wi-Fi in the subway) was something of a fiction, and if users were offered such a service even for a small monthly fee, they would gladly use it. Now such Wi-Fi is provided to all metro users free of charge. All that is required of you is to go through the authorization form (in fact, just click on the “Login” button) and log in to the vmet.ro start page. After that, Internet access is open. In addition, every five minutes you will see an advertising banner in the browser, which closes with one tap. In my opinion, these are quite fair conditions for free use of Wi-Fi throughout the metro.

But no, some users are too lazy to even perform a few simple steps, and they are trying to find a way to bypass authorization in order to immediately use the Internet. Why can't this be done? To better understand how the project is monetized and how MaximaTelecom obtained the rights to build Wi-Fi networks in the metro, below I will give a comment from a company representative:

A tender was held for the construction of a free Wi-Fi network in the Moscow Metro. We, MaximaTelecom, won this tender, after which we started construction. The network is built only on own and borrowed funds. The investment budget is 1.8 billion rubles. No budgetary funds are attracted for the implementation of this project.

For users, the Wi-Fi network on all lines is available completely free of charge. Advertising is placed on the vmet.ro portal, due to which the network is monetized. Various services are also available on the portal, for example, the purchase of tickets or goods, from which we also receive a certain percentage.

As you can see, monetization of the project occurs primarily through advertising. Ads that some users try to cut or remove. It's not a very fair situation. In essence, the consumer uses free Wi-Fi, but for the company it does not pay off due to the use of stub programs.

For me, this question is very fundamental, because Mobile-Review (like most other IT publications) is funded by advertising. This allows users to read all the articles on the site for free, and the authors to devote their main time to the site. The use of a banner cutter on any site is a disrespect for the work of its creators and authors. And I just once again would like to emphasize this to the attention of readers using similar stub applications or AdBlock. We often have arguments with some of the commenters talking about annoying ads. Like, enter subscriptions, we will pay with pleasure. However, in most cases, nothing goes beyond words, and even if we had subscriptions, most likely, these same users would use the free advertising option.

A movie session for 100 rubles, expensive or cheap?

During our third year, we had days when classes started in the afternoon. On such days we met with friends in the morning and went to the cinema. The fact is that tickets for the morning session then cost 50-70 rubles per person. As a bonus, you received an almost empty room. I remember that at the last part of "Harry Potter" we were the only spectators at all. It was quite fun: we commented on the entire film and did not bother anyone (by the way, usually I am against comments in cinemas).

And recently we met with a friend and again decided to go to the morning movie session. Tickets have risen in price a little (100 rubles per film), but the price still looks low.

After watching the film, I went home and thought that this is amazing: for 100 rubles you can watch a full-fledged high-quality film on the big screen. I think this is a very low price. However, people are ready to spend both 300 and 500 rubles on cinema, this is not something surprising.

Personally, it is difficult for me to decide what is more important for me - to buy a completely new product or to be sure that I can always return it without any problems. If I look back at our stores, I like the IKEA experience most of all, when furniture is accepted for return without any problems, and then it is in the discounted goods section, this model looks fair, but is hardly feasible in large chains.

Russian language on readers in Amazon

In the last two or three months I haven't had time to read fiction at all, so this news cannot be called the most relevant. But recently I turned on my Paperwhite, found that it managed to update itself, and decided to look at ChangeLog, in which I was surprised to find support for the Russian language! And although Kindle owners are already aware of the update, potential buyers may not know about it.

For example, my colleague, Roman Belykh, when choosing an e-book for his wife, insisted that it must have support for the Russian language, and the Kindle that was suitable in other respects was eventually excluded from the list.

I remind you that the Russian language appeared not only in the menu, but also in dictionaries, and this is very cool.

Conclusion

A test quiz has recently appeared on Meduza, designed to show how similar the design of modern smartphones is. Readers were asked to determine the name of the model only by the image of its front side. The entire IT community immediately began to retweet their results and brag that they had guessed all ten devices. To be honest, I made a mistake in one of the models. However, to brag about the results of this test is at least strange. It's like a dentist will be proud to answer all the questions of a simple quiz about teeth. We have been working with you for a long time or are interested in the IT industry, so such tests are not a problem for us. But how many correct answers would an ordinary consumer have, this is a big question.

Mobile environment #33. Wi-Fi in the subway

The New Year holidays are over, and we are returning to our usual working hours, however, due to CES 2015, the Mobile-Review team continued to work all last week. The exhibition itself turned out to be relatively boring, however, in my opinion, they say so about CES every year. In any case, CES is over, and we are moving on to more interesting topics.

Wi-Fi in the subway. What is "good" and what is "bad"?

I'll start with some statistics. On average, a person working/studying in Moscow spends about an hour and a half every working day in the metro. This is a pretty decent time, 7.5 hours a week, and 30 hours a month. It turns out that we spend one of the 30 days of the month in the subway. Amazing and a bit scary statistic, isn't it?

However, I think that many have already come to terms with this fact and have learned to either "kill" this time, or spend it usefully. For me, trips to the subway are always connected with curiosity: to see how people pass the time, what gadgets they use, what games they play, what e-books they read from. Actually, it was in the subway that I began to notice how Nokia ringtones were gradually replaced by piano parts from various Galaxy. In general, the Moscow metro can be just a mine of information for someone who knows what to look for.

But that's not what I wanted to talk about today. Even before the New Year, information began to appear massively on the network about how you can skip the vmetro start page and immediately start using the Internet. In short, this uses a special application that is not available in the Play Store, however, Android allows you to install third-party programs using a simple apk file. I will not describe the installation procedure and give links to the application itself, below you will understand why.

Five or six years ago, the very idea that the subway could have stable and fairly fast Wi-Fi (yes, it also has problems, it’s not worth idealizing Wi-Fi in the subway) was something of a fiction, and if users were offered such a service even for a small monthly fee, they would gladly use it. Now such Wi-Fi is provided to all metro users free of charge. All that is required of you is to go through the authorization form (in fact, just click on the “Login” button) and log in to the vmet.ro start page. After that, Internet access is open. In addition, every five minutes you will see an advertising banner in the browser, which closes with one tap. In my opinion, these are quite fair conditions for free use of Wi-Fi throughout the metro.

But no, some users are too lazy to even perform a few simple steps, and they are trying to find a way to bypass authorization in order to immediately use the Internet. Why can't this be done? To better understand how the project is monetized and how MaximaTelecom obtained the rights to build Wi-Fi networks in the metro, below I will give a comment from a company representative:

A tender was held for the construction of a free Wi-Fi network in the Moscow Metro. We, the MaximaTelecom company, won this tender, after which we started construction. The network is built only on own and borrowed funds. The investment budget is 1.8 billion rubles. No budgetary funds are attracted for the implementation of this project.

For users, the Wi-Fi network on all lines is available completely free of charge. Advertising is placed on the vmet.ro portal, due to which the network is monetized. Various services are also available on the portal, for example, the purchase of tickets or goods, from which we also receive a certain percentage.

As you can see, monetization of the project occurs primarily through advertising. Ads that some users try to cut or remove. It's not a very fair situation. In essence, the consumer uses free Wi-Fi, but for the company it does not pay off due to the use of stub programs.

For me, this question is very fundamental, because Mobile-Review (like most other IT publications) is funded by advertising. This allows users to read all the articles on the site for free, and the authors to devote their main time to the site. The use of a banner cutter on any site is a disrespect for the work of its creators and authors. And I just once again would like to emphasize this to the attention of readers using similar stub applications or AdBlock. We often have arguments with some of the commenters talking about annoying ads. Like, enter subscriptions, we will pay with pleasure. However, in most cases, nothing goes beyond words, and even if we had subscriptions, most likely, these same users would use the free advertising option.

A movie session for 100 rubles, expensive or cheap?

During our third year, we had days when classes started in the afternoon. On such days we met with friends in the morning and went to the cinema. The fact is that tickets for the morning session then cost 50-70 rubles per person. As a bonus, you received an almost empty room. I remember that at the last part of "Harry Potter" we were the only spectators at all. It was quite fun: we commented on the entire film and did not bother anyone (by the way, usually I am against comments in cinemas).

And recently we met with a friend and again decided to go to the morning movie session. Tickets have risen in price a little (100 rubles per film), but the price still looks low.

After watching the film, I went home and thought that this is amazing: for 100 rubles you can watch a full-fledged high-quality film on the big screen. I think this is a very low price. However, people are ready to spend both 300 and 500 rubles on cinema, this is not something surprising.

But when it comes to buying or renting movies at home, those same people howl wildly: “I already paid for this movie at the cinema!” "What if I don't like the movie?" “Yes, I’d rather download from torrents!” And this wording is my favorite: “Am I, a fool or something, to buy films??”

But, it would seem, what is the difference between renting a house and going to the cinema? Yes, you may not have a cool TV or expensive acoustics, but there will be no annoying neighbors near Skin Care Products in East Legon, and if you need to go to the toilet, then the movie can be paused. In my opinion, the problem here is not only the greed of consumers, but also the scarce assortment of such services. Even Play Movies and the iTunes Store don't have a great selection of movies.

But, it would seem, what is the difference between renting a house and going to the cinema? Yes, you may not have a cool TV or expensive acoustics, but it’s close by Skin Care Products in East Legon Skin Care Products in East Legon there will be no annoying neighbors, and if you itch to go to the toilet, then the film can be paused. In my opinion, the problem here is not only the greed of consumers, but also the scarce assortment of such services. Even Play Movies and the iTunes Store don't have a great selection of movies.

Issue-free return or used item purchase?

In one of my Friday columns, I talked about the idea of ​​renting a mobile phone before buying one. Commentators then reasonably noted that why pay for rent, if you can buy a smartphone, use it, and if you don’t like it, return it. Indeed, now even large retailers (MVideo, Know-How) offer a hassle-free return within 30 days. However, in fact, this leads us to one of two scenarios. In the first case, the user really accepts the equipment without any problems, only then it is sent back to the shelves, and you can stumble upon a used product that is under the guise of a new one. In the second case, they only tell you about a hassle-free return, and in the end they give you a turn from the gate. This is also a fairly common practice.

Personally, it is difficult for me to decide what is more important for me - to buy a completely new product or to be sure that I can always return it without any problems. If I look back at our stores, I like the IKEA experience most of all, when furniture is accepted for return without any problems, and then it is in the discounted goods section, this model looks fair, but is hardly feasible in large chains.

Russian language on readers in Amazon

In the last two or three months I haven't had time to read fiction at all, so this news cannot be called the most relevant. But recently I turned on my Paperwhite, found that it managed to update itself, and decided to look at ChangeLog, in which I was surprised to find support for the Russian language! And although Kindle owners are already aware of the update, potential buyers may not know about it.

For example, my colleague, Roman Belykh, when choosing an e-book for his wife, insisted that it must have support for the Russian language, and the Kindle that was suitable in other respects was eventually excluded from the list.

I remind you that the Russian language appeared not only in the menu, but also in dictionaries, and this is very cool.

Conclusion

A test quiz has recently appeared on Meduza, designed to show how similar the design of modern smartphones is. Readers were asked to determine the name of the model only by the image of its front side. The entire IT community immediately began to retweet their results and brag that they had guessed all ten devices. To be honest, I made a mistake in one of the models. However, to brag about the results of this test is at least strange. It's like a dentist will be proud to answer all the questions of a simple quiz about teeth. We have been working with you for a long time or are interested in the IT industry, so such tests are not a problem for us. But how many correct answers would an ordinary consumer have, this is a big question.