MegaFon EDGE: Moscow in tight grip

After a short run-in of the new technology in certain areas of Moscow and the region, MegaFon-Moscow is starting a total round-up of the entire GSM network in the Moscow region. How much do we all need this exotic technology and is it worth spending money and resources on it? It looks like it's needed. At least MegaFon-Moscow is sure of this, and Beeline is gradually turning on EDGE, although so far only on part of its BSs within the Garden Ring.

Sounding name

EDGE technology (stands for Enhanced Data rates for Global Evolution) is a promising technology for mobile communications. Theoretically, it provides data transmission in GSM and TDMA/136 networks at speeds up to 384 kbps. Real speeds are still noticeably lower and, according to experts, can reach 200 kbps. EDGE does not require significant improvements to existing GSM cellular networks and this technology can be considered a kind of bridge between 2.5G and 3G generation systems. EDGE technology is also known by the name EGPRS (Enhanced GPRS), which quite accurately conveys the essence of the novelty. The spectacular name EDGE (from the English "edge" - blade, point, cutting edge) was probably invented for aesthetic and marketing reasons.

Technology or service?

Definitely technology. Details about EDGE have already been written and rewritten, including on the Mobile-Review pages. Some misunderstanding is inherited from GPRS (packet data transfer technology) due to the fact that operators still formalize the inclusion of access to the packet transfer mode as a supplementary service connection. It's easier and more understandable for the consumer, although GPRS can rather be considered a transport with which we receive a variety of services (mobile and regular Internet, email, ICQ, etc.). EDGE is exactly an improved GPRS and nothing needs to be specially turned on / connected. Having found a base station with EDGE, the phone will automatically switch to high-speed data transfer mode, if only the device itself can work with EDGE. Leaving the coverage area of ​​such a BS, the phone will switch to normal GPRS mode even without interrupting the data transfer session, switching EDGE-GPRS and GPRS-EDGE occurs transparently and imperceptibly for the user.

How much to pay

You don't have to pay anything extra, data transmission via EDGE channels is charged in the same way as via GPRS: a certain amount of rubles or cents for each megabyte / kilobyte of received and received information. Moreover, it is technically impossible to separately charge GPRS and EDGE traffic, network equipment and software do not allow. We will most likely pay more, but for a different reason: faster internet means more pages viewed, emails leave faster - there is no need to archive documents before sending, etc. But this is a separate topic, to which we will return.

The meaning of implementation and the price of the issue are solid minuses ...

Philosophical and marketing arguments about progress and continuous improvement are left behind the scenes. We formulate a simple question: why does an operator need EDGE and will the costs of the new technology pay off? And isn't it easier to "lay low" until the deployment of third-generation networks begins? For example, MTS has not yet implemented EDGE in the Moscow network, but they feel quite dry and comfortable without any "hedgehogs". On the scale of the entire regional network, there are relatively few GPRS users and the income from them is small, EDGE users will be ten times less. Those. To date, the massive introduction of EDGE means a decent additional cost that will not pay off soon. If they pay off at all. And, what is most offensive, the mass consumer will not even notice our progressive hedgehog when loading screen savers and the beloved "Chernoboomer".

The cost of implementing EDGE is highly dependent on the age of the network equipment. The older, the more expensive. Modern BS from serious manufacturers have been supporting EDGE since mid-late 2003, slightly older BS require additional installation of a special expansion board, in some cases additional upgrades. Most likely, you will need to update the network software, which is also not cheap. Even if the downloaded software already includes the necessary EDGE functionality, unlocking and running EDGE will have to be paid separately. Those. reaching the level of commercial operation will cost incomparably more expensive than the "unofficial" operation of a couple of BS in test mode.

A separate issue is transport routes. The channel allocated for GPRS collects and transmits two to two and a half times more data than the same channel with voice traffic. With the introduction of EDGE, the data flow will increase even more, which will inevitably require an increase in the bandwidth of communication lines. It is good if the network is relatively young and from the very beginning was designed with a margin for data transmission. And if it was built in the last century and only for voice transmission?

You can't get a lot of extra money from users, the tariffs for data transfer in Russian networks are noticeably lower than the world average. And there are not so many users with EDGE phones yet. Although, according to MegaFon's statistics, in areas with EDGE coverage, an increase in data traffic up to two times is recorded, and next year 90% of GSM handsets produced will be EDGE-compatible.

…but there is nowhere to go anyway, you can only delay it

However, most likely it will not be possible to refuse to implement EDGE. 3G UMTS networks will turn out to be too good for the existing GSM 2G+ infrastructure, GPRS systems simply won't "pull" even the greatly reduced functionality of third-generation networks. And somehow you will have to "pull" because you want to sell new services, and it is supposed to promote and advertise new systems precisely by emphasizing new opportunities. Among which, not the last place will be the reception and transmission of streaming video in various forms: from a video call to online viewing of films and commercials. Here you can also download heavy graphics (maps of the area), receive and transmit high-resolution photographs, possibly IP telephony over a data network, remote access to corporate databases, and much more. All this grace should be available in 3G networks, however, "Moscow was not built right away" and at first there will be few UMTS base stations. A commercial service should work everywhere, and not just under a single bush on the embankment of the Moscow River. It may not be very good, but it will work, otherwise it will be difficult for the user to part with the money. And in this situation, Hedgehog is destined for the role of a camel, which, on its prickly hump, must take all these new services beyond the coverage of UMTS base stations.

Thus, by and large, today the operator has two options: start active large-scale implementation of EDGE "here and now" or slowly test the technology and prepare the network infrastructure for that "hour X" when it will no longer be possible to do without EDGE. It is possible that the deployment of third-generation networks in Russia will again be postponed indefinitely, but the laws of the market will come into effect in any case, and in a year the lack of full-fledged EDGE coverage in Moscow will be perceived as a serious lag behind competitors.

Don't you like hedgehogs? Yes, you just don’t know how to cook them!

It's important for users not to set themselves up for fantastic EDGE transfer rates. We went through all this when introducing GPRS: advertising promised all the charms of "high-speed access to all resources of the World Wide Web", and the real speeds turned out to be significantly lower than a high-quality dialup connection. Advertising is advertising. I would like to believe that this time marketers will refrain from aggressively praising super-speeds, and buyers of EDGE phones will also purchase lip-rollers. Without going into kilobit / kilobyte subtleties, the hedgehog perspectives can be formulated as follows: we take a good and stable GPRS connection and mentally increase the page loading speed by about 2 - 2.5 times. Those. a weighted average of 12-15 kb/s can be considered a great success, and 10-12 kb/s is a very good result.

Most users will be able to guess about a successfully caught hedgehog only by indirect signs (transmission speed). The vast majority of EDGE devices do not demonstrate the presence of EDGE in any way. Although there are pleasant exceptions: for example, on all Motorola models, the G (GPRS) icon on the phone display changes to the E (EDGE) icon. In principle, the policy of handset manufacturers is understandable: there is no need for a subscriber of one network to worry about the fact that a colleague sitting at the next table is connected to a more modern operator. For the same reason, no phone displays the number of timeslots given to you. It's good that manufacturers have not yet abandoned the indication of the BS signal level and the famous sticks / cubes still live on the displays.

Hedgehog phones

So far, there are not the majority of them, but let's remember the times when GPRS appeared, when at the beginning of mass operation only 2-3 models were available. Below is a partial list of devices with EDGE support. As already mentioned, the list will be actively expanded this year and in 2006 most new devices will be released with EDGE support.

Nokia 3200, 3220, 6680, 9500, 6270, 6111, N70, N90, N91, 6681, 6810, 6820, 6822, 7710, 8800, 9300, 6630, 6230i, 6230, 6220 , 6101, 6021, 6020, 5140i, 5140, 3230, 7280, 7260, 7270

Motorola T725, V547, V635, V6, V8, V360

LG M4410, M4300, A7110

Alcatel One Touch S835

Sony Ericsson W600, Z500

Siemens CF75, S75, SL75

Sony Ericsson has already released and sells several models of EDGE modems in the PC Card form factor; taking into account quite decent EDGE speeds, the solution looks interesting for laptop owners. Unfortunately, MegaFon-Moscow SIM cards cannot yet be cloned, but even one dollar of a subscriber (a separate contract) does not look like an excessive fee for Internet access "built-in" into a laptop.

Hedgehog population in the Moscow region

Below are the current EDGE territories in Moscow and the Moscow region published by Moscow MegaFon. EDGE is being implemented primarily in < /a> Moscow and surrounding areas/cities with high traffic. By the end of the year, EDGE will cover 30% of the MegaFon-Moscow service area, in total - 500 existing and new BSs. The picture shows one of the new, 1300th base station. Full EDGE coverage of Moscow within the Moscow Ring Road is scheduled for 2006, 100% implementation of EDGE throughout the network of the Moscow region - by 2007.

MOSCOW REGION:
EDGE coverage is provided in these areas as of July 01, 2005

A detailed plan for the development of EDGE coverage in the Moscow region by the end of this year has been published. We are pleased with the indication of specific areas and street names, for such an extraordinary approach to the interests of MegaFon subscribers, special thanks should be said. We do not publish the full list to save space, the file is in pdf format (

MegaFon EDGE: Moscow in tight grip

After a short run-in of the new technology in certain areas of Moscow and the region, MegaFon-Moscow is starting a total round-up of the entire GSM network in the Moscow region. How much do we all need this exotic technology and is it worth spending money and resources on it? It looks like it's needed. At least MegaFon-Moscow is sure of this, and Beeline is gradually turning on EDGE, although so far only on part of its BSs within the Garden Ring.

Sounding name

EDGE technology (stands for Enhanced Data rates for Global Evolution) is a promising technology for mobile communications. Theoretically, it provides data transmission in GSM and TDMA/136 networks at speeds up to 384 kbps. Real speeds are still noticeably lower and, according to experts, can reach 200 kbps. EDGE does not require significant improvements to existing GSM cellular networks and this technology can be considered a kind of bridge between 2.5G and 3G generation systems. EDGE technology is also known by the name EGPRS (Enhanced GPRS), which quite accurately conveys the essence of the novelty. The spectacular name EDGE (from the English "edge" - blade, point, cutting edge) was probably invented for aesthetic and marketing reasons.

Technology or service?

Definitely technology. Details about EDGE have already been written and rewritten, including on the Mobile-Review pages. Some misunderstanding is inherited from GPRS (packet data transfer technology) due to the fact that operators still formalize the inclusion of access to the packet transfer mode as a supplementary service connection. It's easier and more understandable for the consumer, although GPRS can rather be considered a transport with which we receive a variety of services (mobile and regular Internet, email, ICQ, etc.). EDGE is exactly an improved GPRS and nothing needs to be specially turned on / connected. Having found a base station with EDGE, the phone will automatically switch to high-speed data transfer mode, if only the device itself can work with EDGE. Leaving the coverage area of ​​such a BS, the phone will switch to normal GPRS mode even without interrupting the data transfer session, switching EDGE-GPRS and GPRS-EDGE occurs transparently and imperceptibly for the user.

How much to pay

You don't have to pay anything extra, data transmission via EDGE channels is charged in the same way as via GPRS: a certain amount of rubles or cents for each megabyte / kilobyte of received and received information. Moreover, it is technically impossible to separately charge GPRS and EDGE traffic, network equipment and software do not allow. We will most likely pay more, but for a different reason: faster internet means more pages viewed, emails leave faster - there is no need to archive documents before sending, etc. But this is a separate topic, to which we will return.

The meaning of implementation and the price of the issue are solid minuses ...

Philosophical and marketing arguments about progress and continuous improvement are left behind the scenes. We formulate a simple question: why does an operator need EDGE and will the costs of the new technology pay off? And isn't it easier to "lay low" until the deployment of third-generation networks begins? For example, MTS has not yet implemented EDGE in the Moscow network, but they feel quite dry and comfortable without any "hedgehogs". On the scale of the entire regional network, there are relatively few GPRS users and the income from them is small, EDGE users will be ten times less. Those. To date, the massive introduction of EDGE means a decent additional cost that will not pay off soon. If they pay off at all. And, what is most offensive, the mass consumer will not even notice our progressive hedgehog when loading screen savers and the beloved "Chernoboomer".

The cost of implementing EDGE is highly dependent on the age of the network equipment. The older, the more expensive. Modern BS from serious manufacturers have been supporting EDGE since mid-late 2003, slightly older BS require additional installation of a special expansion board, in some cases additional upgrades. Most likely, you will need to update the network software, which is also not cheap. Even if the downloaded software already includes the necessary EDGE functionality, unlocking and running EDGE will have to be paid separately. Those. reaching the level of commercial operation will cost incomparably more expensive than the "unofficial" operation of a couple of BS in test mode.

A separate issue is transport routes. The channel allocated for GPRS collects and transmits two to two and a half times more data than the same channel with voice traffic. With the introduction of EDGE, the data flow will increase even more, which will inevitably require an increase in the bandwidth of communication lines. Well, if the network is relatively young and from the very beginning it was designed with a margin for data transmission. And if it was built in the last century and only for voice transmission?

You can't get a lot of extra money from users, the tariffs for data transfer in Russian networks are noticeably lower than the world average. And there are not so many users with EDGE phones yet. Although, according to MegaFon's statistics, in areas with EDGE coverage, an increase in data traffic up to two times is recorded, and next year 90% of GSM handsets produced will be EDGE-compatible.

…but there is nowhere to go anyway, you can only delay it

However, most likely it will not be possible to refuse to implement EDGE. 3G UMTS networks will turn out to be too good for the existing GSM 2G+ infrastructure, GPRS systems simply won't "pull" even the greatly reduced functionality of third-generation networks. And somehow you will have to "pull" because you want to sell new services, and it is supposed to promote and advertise new systems precisely by emphasizing new opportunities. Among which, not the last place will be the reception and transmission of streaming video in various forms: from a video call to online viewing of films and commercials. Here you can also download heavy graphics (maps of the area), receive and transmit high-resolution photographs, possibly IP telephony over a data network, remote access to corporate databases, and much more. All this grace should be available in 3G networks, however, "Moscow was not built right away" and at first there will be few UMTS base stations. A commercial service should work everywhere, and not just under a single bush on the embankment of the Moscow River. It may not be very good, but it will work, otherwise it will be difficult for the user to part with the money. And in this situation, Hedgehog is destined for the role of a camel, which, on its prickly hump, must take all these new services beyond the coverage of UMTS base stations.

Thus, by and large, today the operator has two options: start active large-scale implementation of EDGE "here and now" or slowly test the technology and prepare the network infrastructure for that "hour X" when it will no longer be possible to do without EDGE. It is possible that the deployment of third-generation networks in Russia will again be postponed indefinitely, but the laws of the market will come into effect in any case, and in a year the lack of full-fledged EDGE coverage in Moscow will be perceived as a serious lag behind competitors.

Don't you like hedgehogs? Yes, you just don’t know how to cook them!

It's important for users not to set themselves up for fantastic EDGE transfer rates. We went through all this when introducing GPRS: advertising promised all the charms of "high-speed access to all resources of the World Wide Web", and the real speeds turned out to be significantly lower than a high-quality dialup connection. Advertising is advertising. I would like to believe that this time marketers will refrain from aggressively praising super-speeds, and buyers of EDGE phones will also purchase lip-rollers. Without going into kilobit / kilobyte subtleties, the hedgehog perspectives can be formulated as follows: we take a good and stable GPRS connection and mentally increase the page loading speed by about 2 - 2.5 times. Those. a weighted average of 12-15 kb/s can be considered a great success, and 10-12 kb/s is a very good result.

Most users will be able to guess about a successfully caught hedgehog only by indirect signs (transmission speed). The vast majority of EDGE devices do not demonstrate the presence of EDGE in any way. Although there are pleasant exceptions: for example, on all Motorola models, the G (GPRS) icon on the phone display changes to the E (EDGE) icon. In principle, the policy of handset manufacturers is understandable: there is no need for a subscriber of one network to worry about the fact that a colleague sitting at the next table is connected to a more modern operator. For the same reason, no phone displays the number of timeslots given to you. It's good that manufacturers have not yet abandoned the indication of the BS signal level and the famous sticks / cubes still live on the displays.

Hedgehog phones

So far, not the majority of them, but let's remember the times when GPRS appeared, when at the beginning of mass operation only 2-3 models were available. Below is a partial list of devices with EDGE support. As already mentioned, the list will be actively expanded this year and in 2006 most new devices will be released with EDGE support.

Nokia 3200, 3220, 6680, 9500, 6270, 6111, N70, N90, N91, 6681, 6810, 6820, 6822, 7710, 8800, 9300, 6630, 6230i, 6230, 6220 , 6101, 6021, 6020, 5140i, 5140, 3230, 7280, 7260, 7270

Motorola T725, V547, V635, V6, V8, V360

LG M4410, M4300, A7110

Alcatel One Touch S835

Sony Ericsson W600, Z500

Siemens CF75, S75, SL75

Sony Ericsson has already released and sells several models of EDGE modems in the PC Card form factor; taking into account quite decent EDGE speeds, the solution looks interesting for laptop owners. Unfortunately, MegaFon-Moscow SIM cards cannot yet be cloned, but even one dollar of a subscriber (a separate contract) does not look like an excessive fee for Internet access "built-in" into a laptop.

Hedgehog population in the Moscow region

Below are the current EDGE territories in Moscow and the Moscow region published by Moscow MegaFon. EDGE is being implemented primarily in < /a> Moscow and surrounding areas/cities with high traffic. By the end of the year, EDGE will cover 30% of the MegaFon-Moscow service area, in total - 500 existing and new BSs. The picture shows one of the new, 1300th base station. Full EDGE coverage of Moscow within the Moscow Ring Road is scheduled for 2006, 100% implementation of EDGE throughout the network of the Moscow region - by 2007.

MOSCOW REGION:
EDGE coverage is provided in these areas as of July 01, 2005

A detailed plan for the development of EDGE coverage in the Moscow region by the end of this year has been published. We are pleased with the indication of specific areas and street names, for such an extraordinary approach to the interests of MegaFon subscribers, special thanks should be said. We do not publish the full list to save space, the file is in pdf format (

MegaFon EDGE: Moscow in tight grip

After a short run-in of the new technology in certain areas of Moscow and the region, MegaFon-Moscow is starting a total round-up of the entire GSM network in the Moscow region. How much do we all need this exotic technology and is it worth spending money and resources on it? It looks like it's needed. At least MegaFon-Moscow is sure of this, and Beeline is gradually turning on EDGE, although so far only on part of its BSs within the Garden Ring.

Sounding name

EDGE technology (stands for Enhanced Data rates for Global Evolution) is a promising technology for mobile communications. Theoretically, it provides data transmission in GSM and TDMA/136 networks at speeds up to 384 kbps. Real speeds are still noticeably lower and, according to experts, can reach 200 kbps. EDGE does not require significant improvements to existing GSM cellular networks and this technology can be considered a kind of bridge between 2.5G and 3G generation systems. EDGE technology is also known by the name EGPRS (Enhanced GPRS), which quite accurately conveys the essence of the novelty. The spectacular name EDGE (from the English "edge" - blade, point, cutting edge) was probably invented for aesthetic and marketing reasons.

Technology or service?

Definitely technology. Details about EDGE have already been written and rewritten, including on the Mobile-Review pages. Some misunderstanding is inherited from GPRS (packet data transfer technology) due to the fact that operators still formalize the inclusion of access to the packet transfer mode as a supplementary service connection. It's easier and more understandable for the consumer, although GPRS can rather be considered a transport with which we receive a variety of services (mobile and regular Internet, email, ICQ, etc.). EDGE is exactly an improved GPRS and nothing needs to be specially turned on / connected. Having found a base station with EDGE, the phone will automatically switch to high-speed data transfer mode, if only the device itself can work with EDGE. Leaving the coverage area of ​​such a BS, the phone will switch to normal GPRS mode even without interrupting the data transfer session, switching EDGE-GPRS and GPRS-EDGE occurs transparently and imperceptibly for the user.

How much to pay

You don't have to pay anything extra, data transmission via EDGE channels is charged in the same way as via GPRS: a certain amount of rubles or cents for each megabyte / kilobyte of received and received information. Moreover, it is technically impossible to separately charge GPRS and EDGE traffic, network equipment and software do not allow. We will most likely pay more, but for a different reason: faster internet means more pages viewed, emails leave faster - there is no need to archive documents before sending, etc. But this is a separate topic, to which we will return.

The meaning of implementation and the price of the issue are solid minuses ...

Philosophical and marketing arguments about progress and continuous improvement are left behind the scenes. We formulate a simple question: why does an operator need EDGE and will the costs of the new technology pay off? And isn't it easier to "lay low" until the deployment of third-generation networks begins? For example, MTS has not yet implemented EDGE in the Moscow network, but they feel quite dry and comfortable without any "hedgehogs". On the scale of the entire regional network, there are relatively few GPRS users and the income from them is small, EDGE users will be ten times less. Those. To date, the massive introduction of EDGE means a decent additional cost that will not pay off soon. If they pay off at all. And, what is most offensive, the mass consumer will not even notice our progressive hedgehog when loading screen savers and the beloved "Chernoboomer".

The cost of implementing EDGE is highly dependent on the age of the network equipment. The older, the more expensive. Modern BS from serious manufacturers have been supporting EDGE since mid-late 2003, slightly older BS require additional installation of a special expansion board, in some cases additional upgrades. Most likely, you will need to update the network software, which is also not cheap. Even if the downloaded software already includes the necessary EDGE functionality, unlocking and running EDGE will have to be paid separately. Those. reaching the level of commercial operation will cost incomparably more expensive than the "unofficial" operation of a couple of BS in test mode.

A separate issue is transport routes. The channel allocated for GPRS collects and transmits two to two and a half times more data than the same channel with voice traffic. With the introduction of EDGE, the data flow will increase even more, which will inevitably require an increase in the bandwidth of communication lines. Well, if the network is relatively young and from the very beginning it was designed with a margin for data transmission. And if it was built in the last century and only for voice transmission?

You can't get a lot of extra money from users, the tariffs for data transfer in Russian networks are noticeably lower than the world average. And there are not so many users with EDGE phones yet. Although, according to MegaFon's statistics, in areas with EDGE coverage, an increase in data traffic up to two times is recorded, and next year 90% of GSM handsets produced will be EDGE-compatible.

…but there is nowhere to go anyway, you can only delay it

However, most likely it will not be possible to refuse to implement EDGE. 3G UMTS networks will turn out to be too good for the existing GSM 2G+ infrastructure, GPRS systems simply won't "pull" even the greatly reduced functionality of third-generation networks. And somehow you will have to "pull" because you want to sell new services, and it is supposed to promote and advertise new systems precisely by emphasizing new opportunities. Among which, not the last place will be the reception and transmission of streaming video in various forms: from a video call to online viewing of films and commercials. Here you can also download heavy graphics (maps of the area), receive and transmit high-resolution photographs, possibly IP telephony over a data network, remote access to corporate databases, and much more. All this grace should be available in 3G networks, however, "Moscow was not built right away" and at first there will be few UMTS base stations. A commercial service should work everywhere, and not just under a single bush on the embankment of the Moscow River. It may not be very good, but it will work, otherwise it will be difficult for the user to part with the money. And in this situation, Hedgehog is destined for the role of a camel, which, on its prickly hump, must take all these new services beyond the coverage of UMTS base stations.

Thus, by and large, today the operator has two options: start active large-scale implementation of EDGE "here and now" or slowly test the technology and prepare the network infrastructure for that "hour X" when it will no longer be possible to do without EDGE. It is possible that the deployment of third-generation networks in Russia will again be postponed indefinitely, but the laws of the market will come into effect in any case, and in a year the lack of full-fledged EDGE coverage in Moscow will be perceived as a serious lag behind competitors.

Don't you like hedgehogs? Yes, you just don’t know how to cook them!

It's important for users not to set themselves up for fantastic EDGE transfer rates. We went through all this when introducing GPRS: advertising promised all the charms of "high-speed access to all resources of the World Wide Web", and the real speeds turned out to be significantly lower than a high-quality dialup connection. Advertising is advertising. I would like to believe that this time marketers will refrain from aggressively praising super-speeds, and buyers of EDGE phones will also purchase lip-rollers. Without going into kilobit / kilobyte subtleties, the hedgehog perspectives can be formulated as follows: we take a good and stable GPRS connection and mentally increase the page loading speed by about 2 - 2.5 times. Those. a weighted average of 12-15 kb/s can be considered a great success, and 10-12 kb/s is a very good result.

Most users will be able to guess about a successfully caught hedgehog only by indirect signs (transmission speed). The vast majority of EDGE devices do not demonstrate the presence of EDGE in any way. Although there are pleasant exceptions: for example, on all Motorola models, the G (GPRS) icon on the phone display changes to the E (EDGE) icon. In principle, the policy of handset manufacturers is understandable: there is no need for a subscriber of one network to worry about the fact that a colleague sitting at the next table is connected to a more modern operator. For the same reason, no phone displays the number of timeslots given to you. It's good that manufacturers have not yet abandoned the indication of the BS signal level and the famous sticks / cubes still live on the displays.

Hedgehog phones

So far, there are not the majority of them, but let's remember the times when GPRS appeared, when at the beginning of mass operation only 2-3 models were available. Below is a partial list of devices with EDGE support. As already mentioned, the list will be actively expanded this year and in 2006 most new devices will be released with EDGE support.

Nokia 3200, 3220, 6680, 9500, 6270, 6111, N70, N90, N91, 6681, 6810, 6820, 6822, 7710, 8800, 9300, 6630, 6230i, 6230, 6220 , 6101, 6021, 6020, 5140i, 5140, 3230, 7280, 7260, 7270

Motorola T725, V547, V635, V6, V8, V360

LG M4410, M4300, A7110

Alcatel One Touch S835

Sony Ericsson W600, Z500

Siemens CF75, S75, SL75

Sony Ericsson has already released and sells several models of EDGE modems in the PC Card form factor; taking into account quite decent EDGE speeds, the solution looks interesting for laptop owners. Unfortunately, MegaFon-Moscow SIM cards cannot yet be cloned, but even one dollar of a subscriber (a separate contract) does not look like an excessive fee for Internet access "built into" a laptop.

Hedgehog population in the Moscow region

Below are the current EDGE territories in Moscow and the Moscow region published by Moscow MegaFon. EDGE is being implemented primarily in < /a> Moscow and surrounding areas/cities with high traffic. By the end of the year, EDGE will cover 30% of the MegaFon-Moscow service area, in total - 500 existing and new BSs. The picture shows one of the new, 1300th base station. Full EDGE coverage of Moscow within the Moscow Ring Road is scheduled for 2006, 100% implementation of EDGE throughout the network of the Moscow region - by 2007.

MOSCOW REGION:
EDGE coverage is provided in these areas as of July 01, 2005

A detailed plan for the development of EDGE coverage in the Moscow region by the end of this year has been published. We are pleased with the indication of specific areas and street names, for such an extraordinary approach to the interests of MegaFon subscribers, special thanks should be said. We do not publish the full list to save space, the file is in pdf format (

MegaFon EDGE: Moscow in tight grip

After a short run-in of the new technology in certain areas of Moscow and the region, MegaFon-Moscow is starting a total round-up of the entire GSM network in the Moscow region. How much do we all need this exotic technology and is it worth spending money and resources on it? It looks like it's needed. At least MegaFon-Moscow is sure of this, and Beeline is gradually turning on EDGE, although so far only on part of its BSs within the Garden Ring.

Sounding name

EDGE technology (stands for Enhanced Data rates for Global Evolution) is a promising technology for mobile communications. Theoretically, it provides data transmission in GSM and TDMA/136 networks at speeds up to 384 kbps. Real speeds are still noticeably lower and, according to experts, can reach 200 kbps. EDGE does not require significant improvements to existing GSM cellular networks and this technology can be considered a kind of bridge between 2.5G and 3G generation systems. EDGE technology is also known by the name EGPRS (Enhanced GPRS), which quite accurately conveys the essence of the novelty. The spectacular name EDGE (from the English "edge" - blade, point, cutting edge) was probably invented for aesthetic and marketing reasons.

Technology or service?

Definitely technology. Details about EDGE have already been written and rewritten, including on the Mobile-Review pages. Some misunderstanding is inherited from GPRS (packet data transfer technology) due to the fact that operators still formalize the inclusion of access to the packet transfer mode as a supplementary service connection. It's easier and more understandable for the consumer, although GPRS can rather be considered a transport with which we receive a variety of services (mobile and regular Internet, email, ICQ, etc.). EDGE is exactly an improved GPRS and nothing needs to be specially turned on / connected. Having found a base station with EDGE, the phone will automatically switch to high-speed data transfer mode, if only the device itself can work with EDGE. Leaving the coverage area of ​​such a BS, the phone will switch to normal GPRS mode even without interrupting the data transfer session, switching EDGE-GPRS and GPRS-EDGE occurs transparently and imperceptibly for the user.

How much to pay

You don't have to pay anything extra, data transmission via EDGE channels is charged in the same way as via GPRS: a certain amount of rubles or cents for each megabyte / kilobyte of received and received information. Moreover, it is technically impossible to separately charge GPRS and EDGE traffic, network equipment and software do not allow. We will most likely pay more, but for a different reason: faster internet means more pages viewed, emails leave faster - there is no need to archive documents before sending, etc. But this is a separate topic, to which we will return.

The meaning of implementation and the price of the issue are solid minuses ...

Philosophical and marketing arguments about progress and continuous improvement are left behind the scenes. We formulate a simple question: why does an operator need EDGE and will the costs of the new technology pay off? And isn't it easier to "lay low" until the deployment of third-generation networks begins? For example, MTS has not yet implemented EDGE in the Moscow network, but they feel quite dry and comfortable without any "hedgehogs". On the scale of the entire regional network, there are relatively few GPRS users and the income from them is small, EDGE users will be ten times less. Those. To date, the massive introduction of EDGE means a decent additional cost that will not pay off soon. If they pay off at all. And, what is most offensive, the mass consumer will not even notice our progressive hedgehog when loading screen savers and the beloved "Chernoboomer".

The cost of implementing EDGE is highly dependent on the age of the network equipment. The older, the more expensive. Modern BS from serious manufacturers have been supporting EDGE since mid-late 2003, slightly older BS require additional installation of a special expansion board, in some cases additional upgrades. Most likely, you will need to update the network software, which is also not cheap. Even if the downloaded software already includes the necessary EDGE functionality, unlocking and running EDGE will have to be paid separately. Those. reaching the level of commercial operation will cost incomparably more expensive than the "unofficial" operation of a couple of BS in test mode.

A separate issue is transport routes. The channel allocated for GPRS collects and transmits two to two and a half times more data than the same channel with voice traffic. With the introduction of EDGE, the data flow will increase even more, which will inevitably require an increase in the bandwidth of communication lines. It is good if the network is relatively young and from the very beginning was designed with a margin for data transmission. And if it was built in the last century and only for voice transmission?

You can't get a lot of extra money from users, the tariffs for data transfer in Russian networks are noticeably lower than the world average. And there are not so many users with EDGE phones yet. Although, according to MegaFon's statistics, in areas with EDGE coverage, an increase in data traffic up to two times is recorded, and next year 90% of GSM handsets produced will be EDGE-compatible.

…but there is nowhere to go anyway, you can only delay it

However, most likely it will not be possible to refuse to implement EDGE. 3G UMTS networks will turn out to be too good for the existing GSM 2G+ infrastructure, GPRS systems simply won't "pull" even the greatly reduced functionality of third-generation networks. And somehow you will have to "pull" because you want to sell new services, and it is supposed to promote and advertise new systems precisely by emphasizing new opportunities. Among which, not the last place will be the reception and transmission of streaming video in various forms: from a video call to online viewing of films and commercials. Here you can also download heavy graphics (maps of the area), receive and transmit high-resolution photographs, possibly IP telephony over a data network, remote access to corporate databases, and much more. All this grace should be available in 3G networks, however, "Moscow was not built right away" and at first there will be few UMTS base stations. A commercial service should work everywhere, and not just under a single bush on the embankment of the Moscow River. It may not be very good, but it will work, otherwise it will be difficult for the user to part with the money. And in this situation, Hedgehog is destined for the role of a camel, which, on its prickly hump, must take all these new services beyond the coverage of UMTS base stations.

Thus, by and large, today the operator has two options: start active large-scale implementation of EDGE "here and now" or slowly test the technology and prepare the network infrastructure for that "hour X" when it will no longer be possible to do without EDGE. It is possible that the deployment of third-generation networks in Russia will again be postponed indefinitely, but the laws of the market will come into effect in any case, and in a year the lack of full-fledged EDGE coverage in Moscow will be perceived as a serious lag behind competitors.

Don't you like hedgehogs? Yes, you just don’t know how to cook them!

It's important for users not to set themselves up for fantastic EDGE transfer rates. We went through all this when introducing GPRS: advertising promised all the charms of "high-speed access to all resources of the World Wide Web", and the real speeds turned out to be significantly lower than a high-quality dialup connection. Advertising is advertising. I would like to believe that this time marketers will refrain from aggressively praising super-speeds, and buyers of EDGE phones will also purchase lip-rollers. Without going into kilobit / kilobyte subtleties, the hedgehog perspectives can be formulated as follows: we take a good and stable GPRS connection and mentally increase the page loading speed by about 2 - 2.5 times. Those. a weighted average of 12-15 kb/s can be considered a great success, and 10-12 kb/s is a very good result.

Most users will be able to guess about a successfully caught hedgehog only by indirect signs (transmission speed). The vast majority of EDGE devices do not demonstrate the presence of EDGE in any way. Although there are pleasant exceptions: for example, on all Motorola models, the G (GPRS) icon on the phone display changes to the E (EDGE) icon. In principle, the policy of handset manufacturers is understandable: there is no need for a subscriber of one network to worry about the fact that a colleague sitting at the next table is connected to a more modern operator. For the same reason, no phone displays the number of timeslots given to you. It's good that manufacturers have not yet abandoned the indication of the BS signal level and the famous sticks / cubes still live on the displays.

Hedgehog phones

So far, there are not the majority of them, but let's remember the times when GPRS appeared, when at the beginning of mass operation only 2-3 models were available. Below is a partial list of devices with EDGE support. As already mentioned, the list will be actively expanded this year and in 2006 most new devices will be released with EDGE support.

Nokia 3200 3220 6680 9500 6270 6111 N70 N90 N91 6681 6810 6820 6822 7710 8800 9300 6630 6230i 6230 6220 6021 6021 5140i, 5140, 3230, 7280, 7260, 7270

Motorola T725, V547, V635, V6, V8, V360

LG M4410, M4300, A7110

Alcatel One Touch S835

Sony Ericsson W600, Z500

Siemens CF75, S75, SL75

Sony Ericsson has already released and sells several models of EDGE modems in the PC Card form factor; taking into account quite decent EDGE speeds, the solution looks interesting for laptop owners. Unfortunately, MegaFon-Moscow SIM cards cannot yet be cloned, but even one dollar of a subscriber (a separate contract) does not look like an excessive fee for Internet access "built into" a laptop.

Hedgehog population in the Moscow region

Below are the current EDGE territories in Moscow and the Moscow region published by Moscow MegaFon. EDGE is being implemented primarily in Moscow and adjacent areas/cities with high traffic. By the end of the year, EDGE will cover 30% of the MegaFon-Moscow service area, in total - 500 existing and new BSs. The picture shows one of the new, 1300th base station. Full EDGE coverage of Moscow within the Moscow Ring Road is scheduled for 2006, 100% implementation of EDGE throughout the network of the Moscow region - by 2007.

Below are the current EDGE territories in Moscow and the Moscow region published by Moscow MegaFon. EDGE is being implemented primarily in
Moscow and surrounding areas/cities with high traffic. By the end of the year, EDGE will cover 30% of the MegaFon-Moscow service area, in total - 500 existing and new BSs. The picture shows one of the new, 1300th base station. Full EDGE coverage of Moscow within the Moscow Ring Road is scheduled for 2006, 100% implementation of EDGE throughout the network of the Moscow region - by 2007.

MOSCOW REGION: EDGE coverage is provided in these areas as of July 01, 2005

A detailed plan for the development of EDGE coverage in the Moscow region by the end of this year has been published. We are pleased with the indication of specific areas and street names, for such an extraordinary approach to the interests of MegaFon subscribers, special thanks should be said. We do not publish the full list to save space, the file is in pdf format (