Free Incoming Bill: First Real Deadlines Appeared

Finally, the long-standing issue of introducing CPP (Calling Party Pays) in Russia has moved off the ground. The State Duma approved in the first reading the draft law on free incoming calls. This does not mean legislative introduction of free incoming calls from December 1st or even January. There is still a second and third reading ahead, then approval in the Federation Council and signing by the president. After that, the operators and the Ministry of Information and Communications will have another 6 months to prepare. Real terms of introduction - spring of 2006, it is good if April, instead of the end of May. But at least some certainty appeared.

After the draft law is adopted, appropriate changes will be made to Article 54 of the Law "On Communications" of the 2003 model - that long-suffering law, which still does not work in full force due to the lack of a number of necessary "Rules". The text of the law can be found here (pdf file

150 Kb). However, "they are waiting for the promised three years," so that very soon all by-laws should be dealt with. The appearance of the draft law on free incoming calls was more likely due to political considerations, since the principle of charging "the calling party pays for the call" could well have been stipulated in the by-laws "Rules". However, the "Rules" tend to take years to develop, to be published with deadlines, but at the last moment to be postponed for another half a year. As, for example, happened with the infamous "Mobile Service Regulations" - those who wish can see the latest available version of this historic document here (pdf file

125 Kb). So let the law be better, less likely to have any administrative surprises.

True, the Ministry of Communications itself should also be informed about the existence of the bill approved in the first reading. Judging by the official response we received, the bill came as a complete surprise to the ministry, like a white piano rolling out of the bushes.

Comment of the press service of the Ministry of Information Technologies and Communications of the Russian Federation on the draft law on the abolition of payment for incoming calls:

At the moment, the draft law on preventing the payment of incoming calls by a citizen subscriber in the form in which it was adopted in the first reading by the State Duma of the Russian Federation has not been officially received by the Ministry of Information and Communications of Russia, therefore it is not possible to comment on this issue. The Ministry of Information and Communications of Russia is ready to take part in the work on the bill, if necessary, and, of course, will comply with any law that comes into force.

Many millions of subscribers of cellular networks have been waiting for the bill for a long time and with impatience. It's no secret that today for most of them "communication with the city" is not a cheap pleasure, tariffs for incoming city calls are rarely humane. At the same time, those who call from apartment phones to mobile phones do this for free, such calls from apartment phones are not charged separately. From the office - another question, here Rostelecom strives to snatch a small separate money for calls to federal mobile, but the intervention of the company's lawyers often helps. All cellular operators have tariff plans with all free incoming calls (for example, the famous "Receptions" in MegaFon-Moscow), but in these tariff plans, "free" incoming reception is carried out for a separate subscription fee. The only exception in the Moscow region is the MTS promotion with their free incoming Jeans-Open. In the event of the legislative introduction of all free incoming cellular operators, they will have to seriously revise their tariff policy and find other sources of funds. For example, increase outgoing call rates and/or introduce connection charges. Indeed, in the regions you can increasingly see TPs with all free incoming calls without an additional monthly fee, but there it is more a matter of marketing and competition in the market.

Unfortunately, in the Led Accessories & Supplies for Electronics in Uganda question about free incoming many subscribers see only one side of the coin and look forward to being able to calmly answer any call and not look at the minute counter during a call. All this and it will be pleasant to receive calls, but how willing will they be to call? In the case of the simultaneous introduction of paid calls from city phones to federal mobile phones, the existing balance of incoming/outgoing calls will quickly recover, but MGTS prices will become a deterrent. From the point of view of logic, all outgoing calls to mobile networks and landlines outside their own zone should become paid, there will be few exceptions: for example, calls through a telephone operator at the expense of the called party (with the consent of the called party), calls to special free numbers (8-800 ... ). In the long term, it should be possible to organize free calls to a regular number (like non-charged 8-800), but it's too early to talk about it.

You shouldn't really hope that mobile operators will simply be obliged to stop charging incoming calls without any compensation, there are no free cakes and someone has to pay for the conversation. Plus, the technical problems of a sharp skew of traffic towards incoming ones. A sharp increase in tariffs for mobile outgoing in this case will help little, as it will lead to an even greater imbalance of traffic.

To some extent, one can sympathize with the Ministry of Communications: it is one thing to set Rossvyaznadzor on a "stupid" organization, and quite another to respond to the many thousands of claims of pensioners who unexpectedly found numbers with many zeros in their telephone bills. It seems that the Ministry of Information and Communications has already begun to slowly prepare for future accusations and build a system of "clarifications".

Comment from the press service of the Ministry of Information Technologies and Communications of the Russian Federation on the introduction of payment for outgoing calls:

To speak about the introduction of payment for outgoing calls for subscribers-citizens at the moment is premature. Today, the principle of payment for outgoing calls is fixed only at the level of inter-operator mutual settlements by Decrees of the Government of the Russian Federation No. 161, 627. After their entry into force on January 1, 2006, operators will have to pay for traffic coming from their networks to the networks of interacting operators. Information appearing in the media about the intention of the Russian Ministry of Information and Communications to establish any tariffs for outgoing calls does not correspond to reality. The tariff setting procedure is administered by the Federal Tariff Service.

We will have to solve a lot of technical and organizational issues. For example, it is not entirely clear how calls to direct mobile numbers will be charged. The consumer has the right to information about the "payment" of the service, and no one will keep a directory with direct number sequences of mobile operators near the phone. Most likely, such calls will be free from landlines, but owners of direct mobile numbers will have to fork out in one form or another. Although in Moscow this problem will be solved by itself after the final division of the city into two zones: when calling any city number, you still have to dial additional code digits and the meaning of the "prestigious" direct number will disappear. There are also rumors about a radical way to solve the problem: direct landline numbers from mobile operators can simply be taken away and only the number capacity in DEF codes can be left for them

Operator's comment - Mikhail Umarov, PR Director of VimpelCom:

Finally, the long-standing issue of introducing CPP (Calling Party Pays) in Russia has moved off the ground. The State Duma approved in the first reading the draft law on free incoming calls. This does not mean legislative introduction of free incoming calls from December 1st or even January. There is still a second and third reading ahead, then approval in the Federation Council and signing by the president. After that, the operators and the Ministry of Information and Communications will have another 6 months to prepare. Real terms of introduction - spring of 2006, it is good if April, instead of the end of May. But at least some certainty appeared.

After the draft law is adopted, appropriate changes will be made to Article 54 of the Law "On Communications" of the 2003 model - that long-suffering law, which still does not work in full force due to the lack of a number of necessary "Rules". The text of the law can be found here (pdf file

150 Kb). However, "they are waiting for the promised three years," so that very soon all by-laws should be dealt with. The appearance of the draft law on free incoming calls was more likely due to political considerations, since the principle of charging "the calling party pays for the call" could well have been stipulated in the by-laws "Rules". However, the "Rules" tend to take years to develop, to be published with deadlines, but at the last moment to be postponed for another half a year. As, for example, happened with the infamous "Mobile Service Regulations" - those who wish can see the latest available version of this historic document here (pdf file

125 Kb). So let the law be better, less likely to have any administrative surprises.

True, the Ministry of Communications itself should be informed about the existence of the bill approved in the first reading. Judging by the official response we received, the bill came as a complete surprise to the ministry, like a white piano rolling out of the bushes.

Comment of the press service of the Ministry of Information Technologies and Communications of the Russian Federation on the draft law on the abolition of payment for incoming calls:

At the moment, the draft law on preventing the payment of incoming calls by a citizen subscriber in the form in which it was adopted in the first reading by the State Duma of the Russian Federation has not been officially received by the Ministry of Information and Communications of Russia, therefore it is not possible to comment on this issue. The Ministry of Information and Communications of Russia is ready to take part in the work on the bill, if necessary, and, of course, will comply with any law that comes into force.

Many millions of subscribers of cellular networks have been waiting for the bill for a long time and with impatience. It's no secret that today for most of them "communication with the city" is not a cheap pleasure, tariffs for incoming city calls are rarely humane. At the same time, those who call from apartment phones to mobile phones do this for free, such calls from apartment phones are not charged separately. From the office - another question, here Rostelecom strives to snatch a small separate money for calls to federal mobile, but the intervention of the company's lawyers often helps. All cellular operators have tariff plans with all free incoming calls (for example, the famous "Receptions" in MegaFon-Moscow), but in these tariff plans, "free" incoming reception is carried out for a separate subscription fee. The only exception in the Moscow region is the MTS promotion with their free incoming Jeans-Open. In the event of the legislative introduction of all free incoming cellular operators, they will have to seriously revise their tariff policy and find other sources of funds. For example, increase outgoing call rates and/or introduce connection charges. Indeed, in the regions you can increasingly see TPs with all free incoming calls without an additional monthly fee, but there it is more a matter of marketing and competition in the market.

Unfortunately, in the Led Accessories & Supplies for Electronics in Uganda question about free incoming many subscribers see only one side of the coin and look forward to being able to calmly answer any call and not look at the minute counter during a call. All this and it will be pleasant to receive calls, but how willing will they be to call? In the case of the simultaneous introduction of paid calls from city phones to federal mobile phones, the existing balance of incoming/outgoing calls will quickly recover, but MGTS prices will become a deterrent. From the point of view of logic, all outgoing calls to mobile networks and landlines outside their own zone should become paid, there will be few exceptions: for example, calls through a telephone operator at the expense of the called party (with the consent of the called party), calls to special free numbers (8-800 ... ). In the long term, it should be possible to organize free calls to a regular number (like non-charged 8-800), but it's too early to talk about it.

We will have to solve a lot of technical and organizational issues. For example, it is not entirely clear how calls to direct mobile numbers will be charged. The consumer has the right to information about the "payment" of the service, and no one will keep a directory with direct number sequences of mobile operators near the phone. Most likely, such calls will be free from landlines, but owners of direct mobile numbers will have to fork out in one form or another. Although in Moscow this problem will be solved by itself after the final division of the city into two zones: when calling any city number, you still have to dial additional code digits and the meaning of the "prestigious" direct number will disappear. There are also rumors about a radical way to solve the problem: direct landline numbers from mobile operators can simply be taken away and only the number capacity in DEF codes can be left for them

Operator's comment - Mikhail Umarov, PR Director of VimpelCom:

The very idea of ​​free incoming is correct and fair, the bill is certainly the right step. The caller must pay for the call. Another thing is that such steps should be linked to a new system of mutual settlements between operators, which we do not have yet. The cost of an incoming call exists and is not so small for a mobile operator. In Europe, a caller from a landline pays for the call to his operator, who in turn compensates the costs of the operator of the "receiving" side from this money. It is not entirely clear yet how these costs will be covered in Russia. "Free" service is an economic nonsense, someone will still pay for such calls. There is also a technical aspect of the issue. Many people will strive to save as much as possible on communications and ask "call me back from the landline", the share of incoming calls to mobile networks will increase dramatically. That will inevitably cause a significant distortion in traffic and serious technical problems.

Free Incoming Bill: First Real Deadlines Appeared

Finally, the long-standing issue of introducing CPP (Calling Party Pays) in Russia has moved off the ground. The State Duma approved in the first reading the draft law on free incoming calls. This does not mean legislative introduction of free incoming calls from December 1st or even January. There is still a second and third reading ahead, then approval in the Federation Council and signing by the president. After that, the operators and the Ministry of Information and Communications will have another 6 months to prepare. Real terms of introduction - spring of 2006, it is good if April, instead of the end of May. But at least some certainty appeared.

After the draft law is adopted, appropriate changes will be made to Article 54 of the Law "On Communications" of the 2003 model - that long-suffering law, which still does not work in full force due to the lack of a number of necessary "Rules". The text of the law can be found here (pdf file

150 Kb). However, "they are waiting for the promised three years," so that very soon all by-laws should be dealt with. The appearance of the draft law on free incoming calls was more likely due to political considerations, since the principle of charging "the calling party pays for the call" could well have been stipulated in the by-laws "Rules". However, the "Rules" tend to take years to develop, to be published with deadlines, but at the last moment to be postponed for another half a year. As, for example, happened with the infamous "Mobile Service Regulations" - those who wish can see the latest available version of this historic document here (pdf file

125 Kb). So let the law be better, less likely to have any administrative surprises.

True, the Ministry of Communications itself should be informed about the existence of the bill approved in the first reading. Judging by the official response we received, the bill came as a complete surprise to the ministry, like a white piano rolling out of the bushes.

Comment of the press service of the Ministry of Information Technologies and Communications of the Russian Federation on the draft law on the abolition of payment for incoming calls:

At the moment, the draft law on preventing the payment of incoming calls by a citizen subscriber in the form in which it was adopted in the first reading by the State Duma of the Russian Federation has not been officially received by the Ministry of Information and Communications of Russia, therefore it is not possible to comment on this issue. The Ministry of Information and Communications of Russia is ready to take part in the work on the bill, if necessary, and, of course, will comply with any law that comes into force.

Many millions of subscribers of cellular networks have been waiting for the bill for a long time and with impatience. It's no secret that today for most of them "communication with the city" is not a cheap pleasure, tariffs for incoming city calls are rarely humane. At the same time, those who call from apartment phones to mobile phones do this for free, such calls from apartment phones are not charged separately. From the office - another question, here Rostelecom strives to snatch a small separate money for calls to federal mobile, but the intervention of the company's lawyers often helps. All cellular operators have tariff plans with all free incoming calls (for example, the famous "Receptions" in MegaFon-Moscow), but in these tariff plans, "free" incoming reception is carried out for a separate subscription fee. The only exception in the Moscow region is the MTS promotion with their free incoming Jeans-Open. In the event of the legislative introduction of all free incoming cellular operators, they will have to seriously revise their tariff policy and find other sources of funds. For example, increase outgoing call rates and/or introduce connection charges. Indeed, in the regions you can increasingly see TPs with all free incoming calls without an additional monthly fee, but there it is more a matter of marketing and competition in the market.

Unfortunately, in the Led Accessories & Supplies for Electronics in Uganda question about free incoming many subscribers see only one side of the coin and look forward to being able to calmly answer any call and not look at the minute counter during a call. All this and it will be pleasant to receive calls, but how willing will they be to call? In the case of the simultaneous introduction of paid calls from city phones to federal mobile phones, the existing balance of incoming/outgoing calls will quickly recover, but MGTS prices will become a deterrent. From the point of view of logic, all outgoing calls to mobile networks and landlines outside their own zone should become paid, there will be few exceptions: for example, calls through a telephone operator at the expense of the called party (with the consent of the called party), calls to special free numbers (8-800 ... ). In the long term, it should be possible to organize free calls to a regular number (like non-charged 8-800), but it's too early to talk about it.

We will have to solve a lot of technical and organizational issues. For example, it is not entirely clear how calls to direct mobile numbers will be charged. The consumer has the right to information about the "payment" of the service, and no one will keep a directory with direct number sequences of mobile operators near the phone. Most likely, such calls will be free from landlines, but owners of direct mobile numbers will have to fork out in one form or another. Although in Moscow this problem will be solved by itself after the final division of the city into two zones: when calling any city number, you still have to dial additional code digits and the meaning of the "prestigious" direct number will disappear. There are also rumors about a radical way to solve the problem: direct landline numbers from mobile operators can simply be taken away and only the number capacity in DEF codes can be left for them

Operator's comment - Mikhail Umarov, PR Director of VimpelCom:

The very idea of ​​free incoming is correct and fair, the bill is certainly the right step. The caller must pay for the call. Another thing is that such steps should be linked to a new system of settlements between operators, which we do not yet have. The cost of an incoming call exists and is not so small for a mobile operator. In Europe, a caller from a landline pays for the call to his operator, who in turn compensates the costs of the operator of the "receiving" side from this money. It is not yet entirely clear how these costs will be covered in Russia. "Free" service is an economic nonsense, someone will still pay for such calls. There is also a technical aspect of the issue. Many people will strive to save as much as possible on communications and ask "call me back from the landline", the share of incoming calls to mobile networks will increase dramatically. Which will inevitably cause a significant distortion in traffic and serious technical problems.

Free Incoming Bill: First Real Deadlines Appeared

Finally, the long-standing issue of introducing CPP (Calling Party Pays) in Russia has moved off the ground. The State Duma approved in the first reading the draft law on free incoming calls. This does not mean legislative introduction of free incoming calls from December 1st or even January. There is still a second and third reading ahead, then approval in the Federation Council and signing by the president. After that, the operators and the Ministry of Information and Communications will have another 6 months to prepare. Real terms of introduction - spring of 2006, it is good if April, instead of the end of May. But at least some certainty appeared.

After the draft law is adopted, appropriate changes will be made to Article 54 of the Law "On Communications" of the 2003 model - that long-suffering law, which still does not work in full force due to the lack of a number of necessary "Rules". The text of the law can be found here (pdf file

150 Kb). However, "they are waiting for the promised three years," so that very soon all by-laws should be dealt with. The appearance of the draft law on free incoming calls was more likely due to political considerations, since the principle of charging "the calling party pays for the call" could well have been stipulated in the by-laws "Rules". However, the "Rules" tend to take years to develop, to be published with deadlines, but at the last moment to be postponed for another half a year. As, for example, happened with the infamous "Mobile Service Regulations" - those who wish can see the latest available version of this historic document here (pdf file

Unfortunately, in the Led Accessories & Supplies for Electronics in Uganda question about free incoming calls, many subscribers see only one side of the coin and look forward to being able to calmly answer any call and not look at the minute counter during a call. All this and it will be pleasant to receive calls, but how willing will they be to call? In the case of the simultaneous introduction of paid calls from city phones to federal mobile phones, the existing balance of incoming/outgoing calls will quickly recover, but MGTS prices will become a deterrent. From the point of view of logic, all outgoing calls to mobile networks and landlines outside their own zone should become paid, there will be few exceptions: for example, calls through a telephone operator at the expense of the called party (with the consent of the called party), calls to special free numbers (8-800 ... ). In the long term, it should be possible to organize free calls to a regular number (like non-charged 8-800), but it's too early to talk about it.

Unfortunately, in Led Accessories & Supplies for Electronics in Uganda Led Accessories & Supplies for Electronics in Uganda On the issue of free incoming calls, many subscribers see only one side of the coin and look forward to being able to calmly answer any call and not look at the minute counter during a call. All this and it will be pleasant to receive calls, but how willing will they be to call? In the case of the simultaneous introduction of paid calls from city phones to federal mobile phones, the existing balance of incoming/outgoing calls will quickly recover, but MGTS prices will become a deterrent. From the point of view of logic, all outgoing calls to mobile networks and landlines outside their own zone should become paid, there will be few exceptions: for example, calls through a telephone operator at the expense of the called party (with the consent of the called party), calls to special free numbers (8-800 ... ). In the long term, it should be possible to organize free calls to a regular number (like non-tariffed 8-800), but it's too early to talk about it.

You shouldn't really hope that mobile operators will simply be obliged to stop charging incoming calls without any compensation, there are no free cakes and someone has to pay for the conversation. Plus, the technical problems of a sharp skew of traffic towards incoming ones. A sharp increase in tariffs for mobile outgoing in this case will help little, as it will lead to an even greater imbalance of traffic.

To some extent, one can sympathize with the Ministry of Communications: it is one thing to set Rossvyaznadzor on a "stupid" organization, and quite another to respond to the many thousands of claims of pensioners who unexpectedly found numbers with many zeros in their telephone bills. It seems that the Ministry of Information and Communications has already begun to slowly prepare for future accusations and build a system of "clarifications".

Comment from the press service of the Ministry of Information Technologies and Communications of the Russian Federation on the introduction of payment for outgoing calls:

To speak about the introduction of payment for outgoing calls for subscribers-citizens at the moment is premature. Today, the principle of payment for outgoing calls is fixed only at the level of inter-operator mutual settlements by Decrees of the Government of the Russian Federation No. 161, 627. After their entry into force on January 1, 2006, operators will have to pay for traffic coming from their networks to the networks of interacting operators. Information appearing in the media about the intention of the Russian Ministry of Information and Communications to establish any tariffs for outgoing calls does not correspond to reality. The tariff setting procedure is administered by the Federal Tariff Service.

We will have to solve a lot of technical and organizational issues. For example, it is not entirely clear how calls to direct mobile numbers will be charged. The consumer has the right to information about the "payment" of the service, and no one will keep a directory with direct number sequences of mobile operators near the phone. Most likely, such calls will be free from landlines, but owners of direct mobile numbers will have to fork out in one form or another. Although in Moscow this problem will be solved by itself after the final division of the city into two zones: when calling any city number, you still have to dial additional code digits and the meaning of the "prestigious" direct number will disappear. There are also rumors about a radical way to solve the problem: direct landline numbers from mobile operators can simply be taken away and only the number capacity in DEF codes can be left for them

Operator's comment - Mikhail Umarov, PR Director of VimpelCom:

The very idea of ​​free incoming is correct and fair, the bill is certainly the right step. The caller must pay for the call. Another thing is that such steps should be linked to a new system of mutual settlements between operators, which we do not have yet. The cost of an incoming call exists and is not so small for a mobile operator. In Europe, a caller from a landline pays for the call to his operator, who in turn compensates the costs of the operator of the "receiving" side from this money. It is not entirely clear yet how these costs will be covered in Russia. "Free" service is an economic nonsense, someone will still pay for such calls. There is also a technical aspect of the issue. Many people will strive to save as much as possible on communications and ask "call me back from the landline", the share of incoming calls to mobile networks will increase dramatically. Which will inevitably cause significant traffic distortion and serious technical problems.